The 9:13 Buzz

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Tady of The Beaver County Times.

In case you missed it here's what he played (with commentary by Scott):

Ben Shannon, "Break on Through" - This Nashville-born, Pittsburgh-based artist launches his debut album with a catchy Jason Mraz-meets-Citizen Cope-ish slice of plain-spoken pop. The lyrics are aimed at the commitment-phobe in us all: "You saw her in a coffee shop/sippin' on a double shot/Typin' something slow on a silver laptop/She was looking real hot/Wanna give her what you got/You think once, you think twice/and you think 'I think not.'"

My Morning Jacket, "Outta My System" - The indie-rock, somewhat psychedelic jam band's last three album's made my year-end Top-10s. The jury is still out on their latest, "Circuital," which began streaming for free more than a week ago. This song is the one that caught my ear the most during my first few listens. The lyrics are profound but simple; the overall production is, dare we say, cute. I'm going to trust Wikipedia, which reports "Outta My System" was written for -- but rejected by -- the upcoming Muppets movie. Must have been the drug reference.

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Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Justin Jacobs, contributing writer to Billboard Magazine, City Paper and Relix Magazine

In case you missed it here's what he played (plus bonus songs):

Dawes, "If I Wanted Someone" - This California band is a perfect mix of CSNY, Jackson Browne, The Band and assorted other totally awesome classic rock acts, and they do it without any irony or nostalgia — just great songwriting, amazing lyrics, perfect harmonies and killer guitar solos. I totally hate this band, if you couldn't tell.

The Antlers, "Every Night My Teeth Are Falling Out" - Pretty much the opposite of sunshiney Dawes — The Antlers just released "Burst Apart," the spooky, minimalist and ice cold follow up to their epic, much beloved "Hospice." The band is great at creating a mood; frankly, I hope they remain about as popular as they are now. It's hard to imagine a sell-out crowd at Smalls getting down to this. Best appreciated with headphones, or when lost in the woods.

Bon Iver, entire album "Bon Iver" - It's really a beautiful record, and completely different than the now-classic "For Emma, Forever Ago." Also, it leaked a month early, so you can likely find it online pretty easily... not that I'm suggesting you do.

My Morning Jacket, entire album "Circuital" - This one drops May 31. It's weird and awesome, and you should totally buy it. The title track alone makes my brain turn into a July 4th sparkler.

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Bon Iver Dawes Justin Jacobs My Morning Jacket The 9:13 Buzz The Antlers

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Mervis of The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Scott:

The Love Me Nots, "He Doesn't Share Well" - As a rule, I'd rather not be driving around Sunday nights between 10 and midnight, but when that happens, it's a treat to flip on Little Steven's Underground Garage on that rock station up the dial. He focuses on '60s garage- and psych-rock and the bands that were influenced by it. Arizona band The Love Me Nots are a perfect fit, rocking hard with a fat, distorted guitar tone and Spector-style girl pop. The local connection is that the band, which just released "The Demon and the Devotee," features former Pittsburgher Bob Hoag (The Breakup Society) on drums.

Ezra Furman & The Harpoons, "I Killed Myself But I Didn't Die" - For years, indie-rock bands played down the importance of lyrics to the point where a lot of people didn't even care about them anymore. With this Chicago band, which just released "Mysterious Power," the words jump out and demand your attention. But it's far from easy-listening singer-songwriter stuff. The Harpoons rock with noise and clatter, like on this song which recalls such indie greats as The Pixies and Pavement.

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Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Andy Mulkerin of Pittsburgh's City Paper

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Andy (plus  bonus songs):

Man Man, "Bangkok Necktie" - This is from the new album, Life Fantastic, from the Philly-based band. The record is, on the whole, quite pleasant and energetic; this was the song I could find that didn’t have swears in it.

Secret Cities, "Always Friends" - This is from Strange Hearts, the new album from this Midwestern three-piece psyche outfit. It’s got their signature muddy baroque sound, but is upbeat and has elements of old rock steady to it.

Poison Control Center, "Porcelain Brain" - Longtime Buzz listeners know I like this Iowa-based band a lot. Their new album, Stranger Ballet, comes out next month, and this song – a Silver Jews-sounding rocker – is on it.

Bare Branches, "Kids in Love II" - This Butler-based band issued a solid album, Haunts, earlier this year. There’s something nostalgic to me about the band’s guitar sounds and Christopher Wagner’s Ian Curtis vocals.

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Andy Mulkerin Bare Branches Man Man Poison Control Center Secret Cities The 9:13 Buzz

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Tady of The Beaver County Times.

In case you missed it here's what he played (with commentary by Scott):

The Smithereens, "Sorry" - No, the Smithereens hadn’t stashed their new album in a vault for 20 years, it just sounds that way. And that’s a good thing. Fuzzed-up guitar and crunchy drums and bass — British Invasion melodies filtered through East Coast pub rock — provide the vibrant backdrop to Pat DiNizio’s rich, vibrato-heavy voice. “The Smithereens 2011” kicks off effectively with this jangly, stomping single with brooding lyrics like, “Well my back’s against the wall/But I’m not afraid at all/I would like to say I’m sorry, but I won’t.”

Andy Friedman, “Old Pennsylvania" - In typically off-kilter fashion, one of Brooklyn’s best and world weariest alt-country singers paints a picture of a late-fall Pennsylvania day in an old, rural town. Critical exultation for Friedman include “the king of art country” (Minneapolis’ City Pages), “art-damaged, ragged-but-right” (L.A. Weekly), “dusty, paint-splattered Americana sage” (Rochester News & Democrat) and “Ingenious originals” (The New Yorker, one of the New York publications for which Friedman has done freelance illustrations.) Indie-rock icon Sufjan Stevens once said, “I’ve always wanted to be Andy Friedman.”) See what the buzz is about May 9, when Friedman performs at Hollywood Gardens, an eclectic, TV-less bar in Rochester, Beaver County.

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Andy Friedman Scott Tady The 9:13 Buzz The Smithereens

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Justin Jacobs, contributing writer to Billboard Magazine and Relix Magazine

In case you missed it here's what he played (plus a bonus song):

Black Lips, "Modern Art" - This is the first cut from this Atlanta punk band's new record, Arabia Mountain, which was produced by Mark Ronson. It's a true story about the band taking ketamine and walking through a Salvador Dali museum in Spain. Not sure if that sounds fun to you, but the song certainly is. This band is pure rock'n'roll - sloppy, catchy, danceable, dangerous, fun. The album's out next month, and it is amazing.

US Royalty, "Equestrian" - Weird name for a song, but somehow fitting — the tune sounds like some majestic ride down a mountain on a horse, probably during a windy day, possibly while wearing a crown or something. Either way, it's a perfect cross between Fleet Foxes, Local Natives and the Black Keys. The D.C. band's most recent album, Mirrors, came out just last month.

Girls in Trouble, "Lemons" - This act got its start writing songs about girls in trouble... girls from the bible, that is. That narrative continues on Half You Half Me, out May 17 on JDub, the sophomore album from Alicia Jo Rabins' band featuring the bassist of Old Time Relijun. The record's no Sunday school affair, though. It's a string-driven, haunting folk record topped with Rabin's plaintive voice and poetic lyrics. Slip it to your rabbi; he'll be exponentially cooler.

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Black Lips Girls in Trouble Justin Jacobs The 9:13 Buzz U.S. Royalty

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Mervis of The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Scott:

Kurt Vile, "Runner's Up" - If the Rolling Stones made a lo-fi album, and let's hope they do, it might sound something like this. This hazy, psych-rock song comes from the Philly singer-guitarist's fourth album, "Smoke Ring for My Halo," his most focused record yet. "I was definitely going for a more cohesive record," he told me last month. "I always go for that. I guess my mind jumps around a little."

TV on the Radio, “Caffeinated Consciousness” - The trailblazing Brooklyn art-funk-noise band has moved on from its early apocalyptic phase and settled into a warmer, mellower groove on the new album, “Nine Types of Light.” It becomes a great showcase for the bottomless soul of front men Tunde Adebimpe and Kyp Malone, both former Pittsburghers. This is one of the more fiery tracks, flashing some rap-rock bombast.

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Kurt Vile Scott Mervis The 9:13 Buzz TV On The Radio

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Andy Mulkerin of Pittsburgh's City Paper

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Andy (plus a bonus song):

The Joy Formidable, "Cradle" - The new one from this Welsh synth-pop-post-punk band is one of my favorites of 2011 so far. Fans of catchy pop hooks; energy; lush, deep recordings; and big words should check it. They play at the Smiling Moose April 27.

Tristen, "Baby Drugs" - I didn’t know a thing about this woman until like a week ago, but this song, and a few others on her debut album, captured my heart. She tows the line between alt-country and straight up pop (in the classic sense) songwriting, and has a wonderful voice. She plays Stage AE next Tuesday (April 12). I also like the video:

Goldenboy, "She Belongs to Me" - This is my favorite track off a stellar release, sleepwalker, by this band headed up by former Elliot Smith guitarist Shon Sullivan. It’s simple, understated and pleasing to the ear.

The Rural Alberta Advantage, "Stamp" - This is my favorite song off this Canadian band’s latest release. I was hoping it would be their breakout, but I feel sort of ambivalent toward the album as a whole – it doesn’t have any tracks that I don’t like, which the band’s previous LP Hometowns did, but it also doesn’t have any that stand out as being amazing, which Hometowns also had. This song, though, has a pretty genius video:

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Andy Mulkerin Goldenboy The 9:13 Buzz The Joy Formidable The Rural Alberta Advantage Tristen

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Tady of The Beaver County Times.

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Scott (plus some bonus songs):

Golden Dogs, "Long As You Like" - The sweet, seductive voice of Jessica Grassia carries this playful pop tune from a Toronto band performing April 3 at Mr. Small's Theatre. The full-length album, "Coat of Arms," is out on April 26.

The Cars, "Sad Song" - Don't be alarmed by the title. This peppy comeback single from The Cars is a pure delight, hearkening to the Boston band's pre-MTV days and songs like "It's All I Can Do," "Touch and Go" and "Dangerous Type." The Cars' album, "Move Like This," arrives May 10; the first studio effort featuring Ric Ocasek in 24 years.

Also been digging this week:
Edwyn Collins, "Losing Sleep" - Released last September in the U.K., where it made a few "top album" lists, "Losing Sleep" finally got its proper U.S. unveiling this week. Mature, accessible lyrics and nifty power-pop guitar make the case that the Scottish artist deserves more than just "one-hit wonder" status here in The States (Remember his Bowie-esque 1994 tune "Girl Like You"?) Guest appearances include The Smiths' Johnny Marr and Franz Ferdinand's Alex Kapranos and Nick McCarthy.

Over the Rhine, "Infamous Love Song" - This hubby-wife folk duo from Cincinnati specializes in songs that unfold with quiet grace emphasizing the soft, elegant voice of Karin Bergquist. But Bergquist can belt out a smoldering torch tune, too, as she does to stirring effect on this six-minute-35-second standout track from Over the Rhine's new album, "The Long Surrender." They play Mr. Small's on April 1.

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Edwyn Collins Golden Dogs Over The Rhine Scott Tady The 9:13 Buzz The Cars

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Justin Jacobs, contributing writer to Billboard Magazine and Relix Magazine

In case you missed it here's what he played (plus two bonus songs):

Okkervil River, "The Valley" -The lead off track from the band's sixth album, "I Am Very Far," due out in May. It falls right in line with Okkervil's best song, "For Real," with it's jackhammer pulse and serious tension. Some folks hate on Okkervil for being too pretentious, but forget about the wordy lyrics ? dudes make great, catchy, emotional rock'n'roll.

The Felice Brothers, "Fire at the Pageant" - Don't turn off the lights; this tale of a burning down building comes complete with a bunch of children shouting. The Felice Brothers have always had a macabre streak, but this tune, off of the upcoming "Celebration, Florida" album takes the cake.

Pains of Being Pure at Heart, "Belong" - I really didn't like this band... until this song, really. Their indie-pop was too cute, or twee, or whatever for me. But this song, off their upcoming second album of the same name, adds some guitar heft and crunch to the mix. Sounds like, as so many have already said, an early 90's Smashing Pumpkins song. Not as awesome, but few could be.

Peter Bjorn and John, "(Don't Let Them) Cool Off" - Remember "Young Folks"? Of course you do. You loved it when you first heard it, then started to hate it after the 8,000 time. Well, forget about that whistle-happy song ? PB&J are back, and kinda sound like a real rock band! This song, from their upcoming "Gimme Some" album, is a catchy rock romp.

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Justin Jacobs Okkervil River Peter Bjorn and John The 9:13 Buzz The Felice Brothers The Pains of Being Pure at Heart

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