Paul Simon

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio: 

Tags:

Pairings Chef Bill Fuller Paul Simon Radiohead The Morning Mix

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio:

 

Categories:

Pairings With Bill Fuller

Tags:

Chef Bill Fuller Pairings Paul Simon The Morning Mix Whiskeytown

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Mervis!

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Scott.

Chet Vincent and the Big Bend, "Doubter's Blues" - This is a Big Bend you haven't heard on record before. On its fourth album, “Unconventional Dog,” the Pittsburgh band sets aside its folk-rock alt-country leanings for a dirtier Southern blues sound with distortion on the guitars and vocals. This opening track, inspired by the frontman's church gig, sets the tone.

Paul Simon, "Biko" - It's no surprise that Paul Simon, who shares an affinity for African music, would deliver one of the few standout tracks on the Peter Gabriel tribute "And I'll Scratch Yours." Gabriel's version was a cinematic tour de force. Simon strips the song about the murdered anti-Apartheid activist down to mostly acoustic guitar and tops it with a moving, melancholy vocal.

Categories:

New Music

Tags:

Chet Vincent Paul Simon Scott Mervis The 9:13 Buzz

For lovers of vinyl, it can feel like torture waiting for Record Store Day in the spring. Luckily, Record Store Day celebrates on Black Friday just like the rest of the retail world, and this Black Friday there are some cool releases. One such album is Dawes' Stripped Down at Grimey's, which was recorded just before their tour with Bob Dylan this past summer.

“This is a recording of the performance that turned me into a devoted Dawes fan,” says Grimey’s co-owner Doyle Davis. “For what it’s worth, I made a point to catch two more Dawes shows within four months of their Grimey’s performance. That’s how fans are made.”

The cool thing about Record Store Day, beyond the obvious support it offers for local record stores, is that the vinyl released is often limited edition or colored. Stripped Down at Grimey's will be offered on a limited edition 12" orange vinyl, so any Dawes fan should make a dash before they're all sold out.

Other Black Friday Record Store Day releases include Paul Simon, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Jack Johnson, Lana Del Rey, The Clash, Tegan & Sara, and many more. The full list can be found on Record Store Day's website.

Below is the song "Most People", one of the Dawes songs that will appear on their RSD release Stripped Down at Grimey's. Have a listen and let us know what you think!

Categories:

Music News New Music

Tags:

Dawes Jack Johnson Lana Del Rey Morning Mix Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Paul Simon Record Store Day Tegan & Sara The Clash

little17

"Kitchen sink music" is one of those useless terms in music journalism. It's thrown out for eccentric, often energetic, and even "exotic" music that doesn't quite fit into the pop spectrum. Little Comets, a trio out of England, often receives this irritatingly vague label, while their music is anything but. The roots of their bouncy, light guitar-driven, and polyrhythmic tunes comes from the same place as Vampire Weekend— afro-pop, by way of Paul Simon's Graceland.

"The Boy in the Bubble," "You Can Call Me Al," and especially "I Know What I Know" are the major reference points for Life Is Elsewhere, Little Comet's sophomore album from this past year. But the synths are for the most place replaced with breezy, noodling guitar, making this October record more of a summer companion. "Jennifer," the lead single, would feel right at home on the first Vampire Weekend album, and "Jennifer, why you have to be so taciturn?" sounds like it could be the direct product of Ezra Koenig. It's a poppy chorus, though, infectious and easy but with the music behind it hiding rhythmic complexities.

"Waiting in the Shadows in the Dead of Night" stands out as the richest song on the album, densely textured with guitar riffs and a echoing sonic background that Brian Eno might smile upon. And it's in the repetitive chorus that exhibits the metrical singing of lead singer Robert Coles, something that defines many of the songs on the album. Almost as a bonus track, an acoustic, piano version of the same song explores a different mood entirely, one where the shadows in the dead of night are not exciting and adventurous, but deep and solemn.

At 13 songs (not including the "Shadows" alternative take), Life is Elsewhere is burdened only by its length. It rounds out to a solid 50 minutes altogether, but that feels almost excessive, as the second half of the album doesn't quite match the distinctive feel of the first half. A better choice would have been to leave more contemplative tunes like the slow "Woman Woman" for a follow-up EP, keeping album as a whole at a more or less brisk pace, and leaving you wanting more. The listener gets his or her fill of afro-pop from Life is Elsewhere, which may be its only flaw. But it's a healthy fill, and hopefully, Little Comets did not use up all its ideas on this wonderful collection of songs.

Categories:

New Music Personal Picks

Tags:

album review Graceland Life is Elsewhere Little Comets Paul Simon

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Tady of The Beaver County Times.

In case you missed it here's what he played (with commentary by Scott) - Best of 2011 version!:

The Decemberists, “The King is Dead” - Oregon folk/alt-rockers tone down the theatricality and embrace a compelling, R.E.M.-ish flavored brand of Americana for their most accessible effort yet. Colin Meloy’s voice and phrasing compellingly set scenes. Released in January, the album still sounds fresh, even after numerous listens.

Paul Simon, “So Beautiful or So What" - Simon is rhymin’ masterfully again on what he correctly labeled his best album in 20 years. The instrumentation is spry and imaginative; the lyrics are exceptional and straightforward. Sample verse from “Getting Ready for Christmas Day,” the album’s leadoff track: “I got a nephew in Iraq/It’s his third time back/But it’s ending up the way it began/With the luck of a beginner/He’ll be eating turkey dinner/On some mountain top in Pakistan.” Then there’s “Questions for the Angels,” on which Simon’s delicate voice strikes a potent note pondering “If every human on the planet/And all the buildings in it should disappear/Would a zebra grazing in the African savannah/Care enough to share a zebra tear?”

The War on Drugs, “Slave Ambient” - Philly band laces shoe-gazer alt-rock with dream pop, then filters it through a classic-rock prism. The result is cerebral, visceral and catchy — in short, a band that can be enjoyed by fans of My Bloody Valentine as well as Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. Singer Adam Granducial’s poetic lyrics chronicle journeys in which thoughts, not landmarks, are the mileposts. He’s drawn Bob Dylan comparisons, owing much to the way his voice lingers on certain words. I’m reminded more of Lloyd Cole.

Categories:

New Music Personal Picks

Tags:

Paul Simon Scott Tady The 9:13 Buzz The Decemberists The War on Drugs

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh's finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Mervis of The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

In case you missed it here's what he played with commentary by Scott:

Paul Simon, "So Beautiful or So What" - Far from a relic, Paul Simon has been a huge influence on Sufjan Stevens, Iron and Wine and other neo-folk artists. But when was his last great album? You have to go back to 1990's "The Rhythm of the Saints," the follow-up to "Graceland." After that, he got mired in the "Capeman" and made a pair of disappointing albums in the '00s. With "So Beautiful or So What," Rhymin' Simon has regained his sense of rhythm and songcraft. Finally, we have songs with hooks, like this passionate title track that comes with a killer funk riff. It's one of the best albums you'll hear from a 69-year-old.

J Roddy Walston and the Business, "Brave Man's Death" - This is basically my favorite new band, and it happened within a week. Heard the CD, the band's second one, and saw them along with a crowd of about 50 people at Stage AE. Was blown away by both. J Roddy Walston is a piano-pounding frontman from Tennessee with a passion for Jerry Lee Lewis and a touch of absurdist Southern gothic. In concert, he did a Little Richard cover ("Lucille") and sang like Jerry Lee on "Don't Break the Needle." This song, a sprawling narrative, is a little more rootsy Americana, but you get the idea. You can file this band with the Avett Brothers, the Black Keys, or even the Black Crowes.

Categories:

New Music Personal Picks

Tags:

J Roddy Walston and the Business Paul Simon Scott Mervis The 9:13 Buzz
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
Instagram icon
RSS icon
Vimeo icon