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Live & Direct: Jessica Lea Mayfield

Discumentary: Bruce Springsteen "Darkness on the Edge of Town"

Although it was not his most popular album, Springsteen released this one just as he was winding down from the success of "Born to Run". With more than 30 unused songs written, he picked these 10, each tell stories of life in working class America.

2009 Local Year in Review Show

Cindy Howes spotlights the best Pittsburgh local music from 2009.

Live & Direct: Ivan & Alyosha

Discumentary: Big Star "#1 Record"

Unlike most other pop groups in the 70ís, Big Star made songs with sensible harmonies as well as catchy hooks. Band mates Chris Bell and Alex Chilton shared guitar and vocals for most of the record. While Big star never received critical acclaim, they unofficially started the genre “power pop.”

Discumentary: Gillian Welch "Time (the Revelator)"

Shortly after the American Folk revival that followed the frenzy around the "O, Brother Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings released this album filled with heartfelt folk songs.

Discumentary: Paula Cole "This Fire"

Cole's sophomore release; this album went Gold pretty quickly thanks to the singles "Where Have all the Cowboys Gone" and "I Don't Want to Wait." But there's more than hit singles to this album, including a duet between Cole and her mentor, Peter Gabriel.

Discumentary: Iggy Pop "Lust For Life"

Iggy Pop released two albums in 1977 during a very prolific time spent in Berlin with David Bowie. Bowie produced and played on both albums, as well as co-wrote some songs with Iggy Pop. “Lust for Life” is considered to be the best of Pop’'s career, and contains some of his best known songs.

Discumentary: Carole King "Tapestry"

Carole King spent the early part of her career co-writing hit songs with Gerry Goffin. In 1971 she released "Tapestry" and the album set the standard for singer/songwriter albums in the 70’s. It was the #1 album in the US for fifteen weeks, and stayed on the album charts for six years.

What a Wonderful World

Rosemary Welsch looks back at the best World music releases from 2009.

Live & Direct: Dr. Dog

Live & Direct: Walk Off The Earth

Ahmet Ertegun Tribute with Tom Moon

On the occasion of what would have been Ahmet Ertegun's 90th birthday, Tom Moon, NPR contributor and author of 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die, spoke with us about the life and lasting legacy of Atlantic's founder and former president.

Discumentary: Bjork "Debut"

After the breakup of the Sugarcubes, Bjork released this album not only to tell the world that she had gone solo, but that she was taking things to a new level. From fun, upbeat dance numbers to sparse accapella songs, this album set the stage for Bjork's varied career.

Discumentary: Wilco "Being There"

The band's sophomore effort is considered one of the greatest albums of the nineties. With elements of power pop, psychedelia, and rhythm and blues mixed in with their signature sound, Being There shows Wilco's evolution from being just a country-rock band.

Discumentary: Cracker "Cracker"

From the ashes of college-radio faves Camper Van Beethoven, came Cracker. David Lowery formed Cracker which brings a mainstream rock sound to his quirky and cynical lyrics. Their debut album earned them success in the growing alternative radio scene of the time, as well as a mainstream hit.

Discumentary: Beth Orton "Central Reservation"

Orton's sophomore release took a step back from her earlier "folktronica" leanings and brought an album that was more organic in sound. This allowed for a focus on her excellent songwriting and performance, enhanced by guest artists like Dr. John, Terry Callier and Ben Harper.

Discumentary: The Band "The Band"

The Band's second album is considered a masterpiece. Recorded in a pool house rented from Sammy Davis Jr., this album features songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" (which was a hit for Joan Baez) and "Up On Cripple Creek."

Live and Direct from the WYEP Studios - 2009

Brian Siewiorek looks back at the best tracks from WYEP's 2009 Studio Sessions.

Discumentary: The Replacements "Let It Be"

Considered one of the greatest rock albums from the 80's, "Let it Be" is The Replacements' third release. A coming of age album in its own right, it's fun and disjointed, complete with a Kiss cover and songs about their bass player getting his tonsils out.

The Beatles - Revolution 2009

Mike Sauter leads you through an audio tour of The Beatles re-releases and events of 2009.

Live & Direct: Guster

Discumentary: Tracy Chapman "Tracy Chapman"

In spirit of the singer-songwriter tradition that was beginning to resurface, Chapman's debut album sits comfortably alongside such names as Natalie Merchant and Suzanne Vega. The album is largely political in nature, dealing with issues such as racism, violence against women, and poverty.

Discumentary: Dar Williams "End of the Summer"

For Dar Williams' long time fans, hearing this album must have been rather shocking, like when Dylan went electric. Williams set aside her acoustic singer-songwriter side and released this more "plugged in" album that features drum machines and electric guitars backing up her soprano voice and...

Discumentary: Creedence Clearwater Revival "Cosmo's Factory"

This was CCR's fifth album, released around the two-year anniversary of their vinyl debut. Cosmo's Factory was the group's peak of popularity featuring "Who'll Stop the Rain" and an eleven-minute version of "I Heard it Through the Grapevine".

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