Discumentary: The Kinks "…Are the Village Green Preservation Society"

Although not commercially successful, this album is a Kinks classic. A "concept" album about Ray Davies' desire for the nostalgia of "Olde England" is played out with songs about Village Greens, Steam Trains and Photographs.

Discumentary: The Mavericks "Trampoline"

Going out on a limb, country radio hitmakers the Mavericks traded in their scaled down production for horns, a string section and a latin-inspired sound. This Discumentary includes excerpts from a WYEP interview with frontman Raul Malo.

Discumentary: The Modern Lovers "Modern Lovers"

This album is a series of demos that The Modern Lovers recorded in 1973 with John Cale of the Velvet Underground producing. It was released three years later three years after the band had broken up. Jonathan Richman used the Modern Lovers name on other projects he worked on, but the original line...

Discumentary: The Pogues "If I Should Fall From Grace With God"

The third album from The Pogues came out in 1988, it was produced by Steve Lillywhite and was the band's first album after some major line-up changes. It is their best-selling album, partially due to the Christmas (and UK #2) song "Fairytale of New York" featuring Kirsty MacColl.

Discumentary: The Police "Synchronicity"

The Police's fifth studio album is revered as their best. Its first single, "Every Breath You Take," earned two Grammys and pushed the album to the number-one position on the Billboard charts.

Discumentary: The Pretenders "Learning To Crawl"

Recovering from the deaths of two of their band members, Chrissie Hynde reinvented the Pretenders with "Learning to Crawl." Her lyrics are more emotional here, but never depressing, as the Pretenders rock out in top form.

Discumentary: The Replacements "Let It Be"

Considered one of the greatest rock albums from the 80's, "Let it Be" is The Replacements' third release. A coming of age album in its own right, it's fun and disjointed, complete with a Kiss cover and songs about their bass player getting his tonsils out.

Discumentary: The Shins "Wincing the Night Away"

The Shins 3rd album was released in 2007, just a few years after Natalie Portman declared that The Shins "...will change your life" in the film "Garden State".

Discumentary: The Smashing Pumkins "Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness"

The Smashing Pumpkins third release is also a double-disc containing 28 tracks. Produced by Flood, they set out to record this album as if it was their last. The band explores a range of musical styles throughout the album from the gentle orchestral pop of "Tonight, Tonight" to the angst-y guitar...

Discumentary: The Story "Angel in the House"

Amherst College English majors Jonatha Brooke and Jennifer Kimball performed in various Boston venues and coffeehouses during their school days.

Discumentary: The The "Mind Bomb"

The The is the concept of its leader, Matt Johnson, the band’s line-up varies from album to album. This time around his band featured Johnny Marr of the Smiths. Controversial and political in nature, Mind Bomb features songs with titles like like “The Beat(en) Generation” and “Armageddon Days are...

Discumentary: The Verve "Urban Hymns"

Considered by many to be one of the most influential albums of the nineties, Urban Hymns remains timeless in content. Despite internal struggles, drug addictions and a large lawsuit from the Rolling Stones, The Verve were able to create an album with grand atmosphere and true sense of purpose.

Discumentary: The White Stripes "White Blood Cells"

The third release by the White Stripes showcases a more polished and refined sound than their previous efforts. The songs on the album show the range of the group’s influences, from Led Zeppelin to early Delta Blues. The music takes elements of these influences and fuses them with new trends.

Discumentary: The Who "The Who Sell Out"

British rock legends The Who made their third album as an homage to Radio London. To give the album more of a "corporate" feel, they added in commercials here and there, with the album cover showing the band plugging product like Heinz Baked Beans.

Discumentary: They Might Be Giants "Flood"

John Linnell and John Flansburgh had their breakout success with their major label debut. The biggest hit off the album, "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)," was actually a cover, but their take on it fits in with the rest of the album. Flood is their best selling album to date.

Discumentary: Tom Petty "Wildflowers"

Produced by Rick Rubin, Tom Petty's second solo album, "Wildflowers" was certified three times platinum in 1995. Critics praised the album, albeit being almost an hour long. Petty won his first Grammy for his performance of "You Don't Know How It Feels".

Discumentary: Tom Waits "Swordfishtrombones"

His record label considered this album much stranger than his previous albums so they dropped Tom Waits and he took his work elsewhere. Island Records signed him and released the album in 1983 to a warm reception from fans and critics. Known for the varieties of percussion and horn experimentation...

Discumentary: Tom Waits "The Heart of Saturday Night"

Tom Waits was in the process of creating his distinctive stage persona at the time of his second studio release. "The Heart of Saturday Night" finds Waits trading in his earlier folk-rock arrangements for a 1950’s West Coast style of jazz and Waits' newly evolving gruff vocal presentation.

Discumentary: Toots and the Maytals "Funky Kingston"

Toots and the Maytals brought fourth Jamaican traditions in both sound and style. The album featured the song "Do the Reggay" which led to the term Reggae. The band also made reggae versions of "Louie Louie" and John Denver's Country Roads.

Discumentary: Tori Amos "Under the Pink"

Mostly recorded in a hacienda in New Mexico, "Under the Pink" is Tori Amos' second solo album. Even more piano-focused than her first, it features the singles "God" and "Cornflake Girl."

Discumentary: Tracy Chapman "Tracy Chapman"

In spirit of the singer-songwriter tradition that was beginning to resurface, Chapman's debut album sits comfortably alongside such names as Natalie Merchant and Suzanne Vega. The album is largely political in nature, dealing with issues such as racism, violence against women, and poverty.

Discumentary: U2 "Boy"

U2's debut album is considered to be one of the finest first albums of any band in the 1980's. It set the stage for the band's future mega-stardom.

Discumentary: U2 "The Joshua Tree"

For this record, U2 created a dark, expressive and American influenced sound deriving from rock, blues and country. The Edge's trademark echoing guitar work and Bono's passionate lyrics on songs such as "I still haven't found what I'm looking for" and "Where the streets have no name" helped the...

Discumentary: Uncle Tupelo "Anodyne"

Uncle Tupelo's final effort is often hailed as their best, a perfect blend of the elements in their country-rock sound. This album was recorded completely live in an Austin studio. Less than a year after its release, both Son Volt and Wilco had been created from Uncle Tupelo's ashes.

Discumentary: Van Morrison "Astral Weeks"

The former lead singer of Them released his second solo album which became a favorite of critics. The album was recorded in two days in a New York City studio and was ranked as the 19th greatest album of all time, according to Rolling Stone Magazine.

Discumentary: Victoria Williams "Loose"

Before this album, Victoria Williams was pretty much a musician's musician. Her unique and unusual singing voice as well as her songwriting grabbed her a devout following. A tribute album that came out just before Loose raised money to pay for it.

Discumentary: Warren Zevon "Excitable Boy"

Before this album was released Warren Zevon was a singer/songwriter with a few albums out. His biggest claim to fame was that Linda Ronstadt had recorded some of his songs. "Excitable Boy" was the big breakout album for him, containing the big hit "Werewolves of London", a song that takes days to...

Discumentary: Wilco "Being There"

The band's sophomore effort is considered one of the greatest albums of the nineties. With elements of power pop, psychedelia, and rhythm and blues mixed in with their signature sound, Being There shows Wilco's evolution from being just a country-rock band.

Discumentary: Wilco "Yankee Hotel Foxtrot"

Almost two years in the making, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot had Wilco jumping record labels, losing band members and significantly changing their sound. The result was worth it for the band, resulting in one of the most beloved albums of 2002.

Discumentary: X "Los Angeles"

Narrative songs and harmonies gave the band X an edge in the Los Angeles punk music scene. Produced by Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, Los Angeles includes a cover of Jim Morrison's "Soul Kitchen."

Discumentary: XTC "Skylarking"

The British band's eighth album is considered a "pop masterpiece" and one of the best albums made in the 80's. Produced by Todd Rundgren, there was much conflict during the recording sessions, but the album broke the band on to the U.S. charts with the song "Dear God".

Discumentary: Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers "Conscious Party"

This is the breakout album for Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers, it includes the single "Tomorrow People." Produced by Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club members Tina Weymouth and Chris Franz, this album is one of the top-selling reggae albums ever.

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