Discumentary: Sam Phillips Martinis & Bikinis

Getting her start in the Christian music community, Sam Phillips left after a dispute with her label at the time. She signed with Virgin Records in 1989. "Martinis and Bikinis", her fourth solo album that was produced by her future husband T-Bone Burnett.

Discumentary: Sarah McLachlan "Fumbling Towards Ecstasy"

With only a small cult following in the U.S., Sarah McLachlan released this album and watched her star rise. The album features one of her best-known songs, "Posession" about obsession from a stalker's perspective.

Discumentary: Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings "100 Days, 100 Nights"

By 2007, The Dap Kings were rising stars in music, due to their appearance on Amy Winehouse's "Back in Black" a year earlier. With Sharon Jones on vocals, the group released their 3rd album that year. Recorded on all analog equipment, the album sounds like an old classic, while still remaining...

Discumentary: Shuggie Otis "Inspiration Information"

Rediscovered and re-released by David Byrne in 2001, this album holds up more now than it did in 1974. Far ahead of his time, Shuggie Otis and this album are cited as influences by many electronic artists today. The son of bandleader Johnny Otis, Shuggie only released two albums and performs live...

Discumentary: Sigur Rós "Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust"

Translated to "With A Buzz in Our Ears We Play Endlessly", Sigur Rós' 5th album was one of many changes.  They developed it with a different process, recorded it outside of their home country of Iceland, with a different producer.  The result is one of their more happy sounding...

Discumentary: Simon and Garfunkel "Bookends"

Following the success of the Graduate, Simon and Garfunkel put together a well crafted folk album featuring Simon's poignant lyrics and Garfunkel's elusive vocals. The album featured a completed and re-arranged version of Mrs. Robinson, the hit song America, and a recording of old people simply...

Discumentary: Sinead O'Connor "I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got"

I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got is O'Connor's sophomore album and the follow up to 1987's The Lion and the Cobra. Her hit song Nothing Compares to you, written by Prince helped propel her to stardom. It was her no-nonsense approach of the album influenced several female singer-songwriters from...

Discumentary: Sly and the Family Stone "Stand!"

Sly Stone and his group sounded different than the hippie bands coming out of San Francisco in the late Sixties. But the integrated group's message was still one of peace, love and understanding. Their funky sound earned them a bunch of hits, including the album's title track.

Discumentary: Son Volt "Trace"

After the break up of alt-country pioneers Uncle Tupelo, Jay Farrar formed Son Volt. This is the band's debut which continues on a darker path somewhere between country and rock and roll. Well received by critics, it is considered by many to be one of the best albums of 1995.

Discumentary: Steely Dan "Pretzel Logic"

In 1974 Steely Dan was structured as a standard band consisting of Walter Becker, Donald Fagen, Denny Dias, Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, and Victor Feldman. Under the guidance of producer Gary Katz the band's songs became more complex and featured a tribute to Charlie Parker and a cover of a Duke Ellington...

Discumentary: Steve Earle "Guitar Town"

Steve Earle's 1986 debut was hailed by critics as an instant classic. Earle's writing style incorporated elements of Townes Van Zandt's mournful ballads and Springsteen's depictions of small town life.

Discumentary: Stevie Wonder "Talking Book"

This album was released in October of 1972 during what is considered Stevie Wonder's "classic period" and garnered the artist 3 Grammy Awards. Hailed as one of the greatest crossover albums of all time, it broke down the boundaries as it climbed to the top of both Billboard's rock and R&B charts.

Discumentary: Susan Tedeschi "Just Won't Burn"

This album received rave reviews from blues fans who praised Tedeschi for continuing and advancing the blues tradition. It features 5 songs written by Tedeschi plus a few written by her band members Tom Hambridge and Adrienne Young. Just Won't Burn went to number 2 on the mainstream blues charts,...

Discumentary: T-Rex "Electric Warrior"

Marc Bolan's folk-influenced songs took on a new life when matched with the electric-blues-influenced rhythm section of drummer Bill Legend and bassist Steve Currie. This is one of Glam-rock's quintessential albums. Produced by Tony Visconti, the album hit the top of the British charts and the song...

Discumentary: Taj Mahal "The Natch'l Blues"

Taj Mahal released his second album in the fall of 1968. Building on his multi-cultural approach to the blues these songs feature elements of Delta blues but also include an expanding range of influences including rock and country.

Discumentary: Talking Heads "The Fear of Music"

The Talking Heads grew out of the New York punk scene playing alongside Patti Smith and the Ramones. For their third album they teamed up with Brian Eno for a darker approach to their quirky post-punk music.

Discumentary: The Allman Brothers "Eat A Peach"

The Allman Brothers 1972 release "Eat A Peach" features the last work of founder and slide guitarist Duane Allman who died in a motorcycle accident during the recording process. The album is consider the standard bearer for southern blues/rock and features the classic tracks "Melissa" and "Blue Sky...

Discumentary: The Avett Brothers "Emotionalism"

The Avett Brothers' 5th studio album was their breakout success. Demonstrating their growth as a band and featuring spirited harmonies and thoughtful lyrics. This is their last release before being signed to a major label.

Discumentary: The B-52's "The B-52's"

The B-52's were unlike anything out there when they released their debut album, the band's unique approach made them a hit, and had songs like "Rock Lobster" and "Planet Claire" spinning at parties all over the world.

Discumentary: The Band "The Band"

The Band's second album is considered a masterpiece. Recorded in a pool house rented from Sammy Davis Jr., this album features songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" (which was a hit for Joan Baez) and "Up On Cripple Creek."

Discumentary: The Beach Boys "Pet Sounds"

The Beach Boys came of age with this album, which represented a new direction for the group. Filled with the Boys' perfect harmonies and Brian Wilson's obsessive production, Pet Sounds is considered one of the greatest albums of all time.

Discumentary: The Beatles "Rubber Soul"

Released in December 1965, "Rubber Soul" signified a change in approach for The Beatles.  The group wasn't making teen pop songs anymore, along with George Martin as producer, this album began to show the group's experimentation with folk-rock and other instrumentations.

Discumentary: The Beatles "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"

Sgt. Pepper's was released in June of 1967, solidifying the Beatles new style introduced in their 1966 album Revolver. The complex and arrangements along with Martin's innovative production style recreated rock music in an album that Rolling Stone considers to be the greatest of all time.

Discumentary: The Black Keys "Brothers"

The Black Keys' sixth release is also the first album recorded at the legendary Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in 25 years.  "Brothers" is considered the band's breakout release, it went to #3 on the Billboard Album Chart and won the group 3 Grammy Awards.

Discumentary: The Breeders "Last Splash"

The Breeders second full-length album is considered to be among the best of the 90's.  Released in 1993,  during the height of the "Alternative Rock" phenomenon.  It sold one million copies in less than a year and includes the hit, "Cannonball".  

Discumentary: The Church "Starfish"

The album that The Church is most renowned for, it features their smash single "Under the Milky Way". The U.S. breakthrough gave the Church a top forty hit and a Gold album, as well as sold out world tours.

Discumentary: The Clash "London Calling"

On their third release, British punk-rock legends The Clash made their political stances even more apparent. Criticizing the likes of Margaret Thatcher and American consumerism. This is considered by many to be one of the greatest albums ever recorded.

Discumentary: The Cranberries "Everybody else is doing it, So Why Can't We?"

The Cranberries formed in Limerick, Ireland in 1990, and three years later they had their first of many Top 10 hits. The band's sound is defined by the vocals of Dolores O'Riordan, who co-writes the songs with bass player Noel Hogan.

Discumentary: The Cure "The Head On The Door"

The Cure's sixth album merged their signature dark-goth and their pop sound which they achieved with later albums. The Head On The Door shows the band experimenting with different sylings and arrangements. This album gave them their first big success in America, reaching #59 on the Billboard album...

Discumentary: The Decemberists "The Crane Wife"

The Crane Wife is the fourth album and the first on a major label for The Decemberists. Produced by Tucker Martine and Death Cab for Cutie's Chris Walla, the album retells a Japanese folktale and tells many stories of war-torn love affairs.

Discumentary: The Eurythmics "Touch"

Many call this a groundbreaking album, as it experimented with rapid electronic beats long before the word "techno" was ever thought up as a music genre. It was also tremendously successful commercially, generating three hits that were eased into popularity thanks to the newly assembled MTV.

Discumentary: The Flaming Lips "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots"

The main theme of this album is based on a Japanese girl who is set to fight an army of robots that are pink. Less of a concept album and more of an album in which certain songs have a narrative thread, the Lips experimentation with music, makes this an album in which you hear something new every...

Discumentary: The Hold Steady "Boys and Girls in America"

The Hold Steady's third release elevated them further in the eyes of critics and the hearts of fans. "Boys and Girls in America" many most "best of 2006" lists. This Discumentary features interview clips from The Hold Steady's visit to WYEP in 2007.

Discumentary: The Jam "All Mod Cons"

The punk/mod-revival band The Jam released their 3rd full-length release in 1978. “All Mod Cons” produced one of their biggest hits, “Down In The Tube At Midnight” and received both commercial success and critical acclaim.

Discumentary: The Jayhawks "Rainy Day Music"

The Jayhawks returned to their country-rock roots with their seventh and fina album, "Rainy Day Music." It also features guest performances from Jakob Dylan, Chris Stills and Matthew Sweet.

Discumentary: The Jimi Hendrix Experience "Electric Ladyland"

This is the third, last and most experimental album that The Jimi Hendrix Experience released. It shows Hendrix’s versatility; not only as a guitarist, but also as a singer and producer. Even with its experimental nature, it generated a couple of hits for Hendrix at the time, and remains a...

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