Discumentary: Jeff Buckley "Grace"

Jeff Buckley's only complete studio album featured a strong Led Zeppelin influence and, although critically acclaimed, was not initially a commercial success. Over the years it has gained legendary status thanks to Buckley's stunning version of Leonard Cohen's iconic song "Hallelujah" and for his...

Discumentary: Joan Armatrading "Walk Under Ladders"

Armatrading's second non-acoustic album turned her into a pop star in Britian. For this album she ranges from folk rock, to new wave to reggae. She's joined by Thomas Dolby, Sly and Robbie, Steve Lillywhite and Andy Partridge from XTC.

Discumentary: Joan Baez "Diamonds & Rust"

Folk artist and activist Joan Baez released her album "Diamonds and Rust" in 1975. Now considered one of her seminal works, the album went gold. Its title track, a ballad that explored her relationship with Bob Dylan, proved to be one of her biggest hits, and eventually hit number 35 on the pop...

Discumentary: Joe Jackson "Night and Day"

Joe Jackson's 5th release, Night & Day, was released in 1982 and marked a departure from his earlier work. The title, taken from a Cole Porter song, reflected a new sophistication in songwriting and garnered Jackson two of his biggest hit songs, "Breaking Us In Two" and "Steppin Out."

Discumentary: Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros "Streetcore"

Strummer's last album, which was finished by his band after his death, included introspective lyrics and a heavy reggae influence. The album is considered one of Strummer's finest since the Clash. It is partially produced by Rick Rubin, and features a cover of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song".

Discumentary: John Hammond "Wicked Grin"

A remarkable album of songs written by Tom Waits, performed by John Hammond, produced by Tom Waits. The result leads to new interpretations of some of Waits' best known songs, and a feat rarely seen in the music industry.

Discumentary: John Lee Hooker "Don't Look Back"

John Lee Hooker was already a legend before the making of this album. Produced by Van Morrison and Los Lobos, it features new songs a few classic remakes, further cementing his legendary status.

Discumentary: John Lennon "Imagine"

Known as Lennon's most important work, this album features its anthemic title track, Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound", scathing lyrics about Paul McCartney, and the guitar playing of George Harrison. Released in 1971, it was the first of only three of Lennon’s solo albums to hit #1.

Discumentary: Johnny Cash "American Recordings"

Some artists need to appear younger or hipper to appeal to a younger audience. Not Johnny Cash, he sat down with his guitar, and did the same thing that made him a legend many years ago. This album, produced by Rick Rubin, won Cash a whole new generation of fans.

Discumentary: Joni Mitchell "Court and Spark"

Joni Mitchell introduced jazz inflections into her folk-rock style signaling a new direction for the Canadian singer/songwriter. "Help Me" became Mitchell's only top-ten hit and the album hit double platinum.

Discumentary: Josh Ritter "Hello Starling"

When Josh Ritter's third album was released in 2003 he was still fairly unknown in the United States, yet the album debuted at #2 in Ireland. "Hello Starling" showcased Ritter's gift for songwriting and paved the way for his later success.

Discumentary: Kathleen Edwards "Failer"

Kathleen Edwards shot to the forefront of the alternative country scene with her 2003 debut release. Her blunt lyrics, character sketch approach to songwriting, and sexy prairie drawl drew raves from critics and comparisons to Lucinda Williams.

Discumentary: Kirsty MacColl "Tropical Brainstorm"

Disappointed with the music industry and recovering from a divorce, Kirsty MacColl, took six years off before recording "Tropical Brainstorm". During her break, she spent a lot of time in Cuba and Brazil, which inspired the album's many tropical influences.

Discumentary: Lauryn Hill "The Mis-Education of Lauryn Hill"

Following the huge success of the Fugees, Lauryn Hill went solo with this one. Creating a disc of very personal songs, she demonstrated just how versatile Hip Hop could be. It also showed that Hill could be a force on her own, by winning 5 Grammy Awards and earning a Gold Record.

Discumentary: Leonard Cohen "Songs of Leonard Cohen"

Already an established poet and novelist, Leonard Cohen released his debut album in 1967. Audiences were drawn to his literate songwriting on songs like "Suzanne" and "So Long Marianne".

Discumentary: Linda Ronstadt "Heart Like a Wheel"

Ronstadt's fifth album was released in 1974, and made her a star. She perfects her folk-rock sound through covers of songs by Paul Anka, Hank Williams and Anna McGarrigle. This album had number one hits on the Country and Pop charts, went platinum, and even earned Ronstadt a Grammy award.

Discumentary: Little Feat "Feats Don't Fail Me Now"

Little Feat continued to explore southern roots-rock and bayou funk and groove on "Feats Don't Fail Me Now". The songwriting of Lowell George and Bill Payne combined with the band's exceptional musicianship set the bar for future boogie bands.

Discumentary: Liz Phair "Exile in Guyville"

Upon its release, Interview Magazine called Exile in Guyville "folk rock that could make you blush". This is Liz Phair's response to the Rolling Stones classic Exile in Guyville -- a pretty big undertaking for a debut album.

Discumentary: Loretta Lynn "Van Lear Rose"

Loretta Lynn had been performing for more than 40 years before releasing "Van Lear Rose". The album was produced by White Stripes guitarist Jack White, who was also the band leader in the recordings. Reaching the number-two spot on Billboard's country album charts and 24 on the Top 200, "Van Lear...

Discumentary: Los Lobos "Kiko"

Probably best known for their soundtrack work for the Ritchie Valens biopic "La Bamba", Los Lobos created some of their most acclaimed work after their #1 hit. For "Kiko" the group experiments with their sound on songs that range in topics from homelessness to hopefulness.

Discumentary: Lou Reed & John Cale "Songs For Drella"

Songs for Drella reunited former Velvet Underground members Lou Reed and John Cale for the first time since 1968. The two got together shortly after the death of Andy Warhol and decided to pay tribute to his life. The songs feature vocals from both Cale and Reed, focusing on story rather than...

Discumentary: Lucinda Williams "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road"

Lucinda Williams took 6 years to complete "Car Wheels On a Gravel Road" but the album won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album and has made many top 100 albums lists. Williams writes sparse, unsparingly honest and often painful stories of ordinary lives.

Discumentary: Luna "Penthouse"

With "Penthouse", Luna expanded their sound adding cellos, vibraphones and keyboards in with their trademark fuzzy guitar sound. Included among _Rolling Stone_'s 150 essential albums of the 90's, this one also features the guitar work of Televison's Tom Verlaine.

Discumentary: Lyle Lovett "Joshua Judges Ruth"

In 1992, Lyle Lovett was working to break out of the idea that he was "just" a Country musician. On this album he added influences of Gospel and Rhythm and Blues. It was his biggest mainstream success up to the time, and was mostly ignored by Country radio.

Discumentary: Marcia Ball "Gatorhythms"

Marcia Ball mixes the blues with country honky-tonk and a little boogie on this album. This is the first album to showcase Ball's songwriting skills and it also features her notorious piano playing, that at times would make Jerry Lee Lewis jealous.

Discumentary: Marvin Gaye "What's Going On"

Released in 1971 at the height of societal unrest, Marvin Gaye tackled issues ranging from drug abuse to poverty to the Vietnam War, and created one of the most influential albums of all time. "What's Going On?" was also the first album to credit Motown's great session band, The Funk Brothers.

Discumentary: Matthew Sweet "Girlfriend"

Amid a divorce, Matthew Sweet worked on songs for his third album. "Girlfriend" was released on Zoo Entertainment after Sweet was dropped by A&M. Released in the heyday of alternative music radio, the album became a hit in the era of Nirvana and grunge-rock.

Discumentary: Michael Franti "Everyone Deserves Music"

Creating what he calls 'Conscious Music for the Masses', Micheal Franti tackles topics like AIDS, homelessness and police brutality but sets these themes to melodies you can groove to. "Everyone Deserves Music" is an extension of this method that includes elements of funk, folk, reggae and rock....

Discumentary: Michelle Shocked "Short, Sharp, Shocked"

Short, Sharp, Shocked has a folky sound with a bit of country-tinged production and a collection of personal songs inspired by her youth. The album received great reviews upon its release. Its biggest hit was the song "Anchorage", a letter from a friend, set to music.

Discumentary: Miriam Makeba "Homeland"

Miriam Mekaba's life has been an interesting one. From her beginnings as a South African jazz singer to her thirty year exile from her homeland. Mekaba chronicles these experiences on this disc, and also updates her worldwide hit "Pata Pata".

Discumentary: Moby "Play"

After becoming a popular DJ, and the success of his first few techno albums, Moby makes one of his most diverse albums. Here he strays from strictly eclectronica and blends elements of rock, blues, gospel and hip-hop, and even plays every instrument on the album.

Discumentary: Morcheeba "Who Can You Trust?"

The British trio's debut album had them bringing something different to the world of Trip Hop. The group's Soul influences added to their distinctive atmospheric sound, and got them noticed by many who added this 'chill out' album to their collections.

Discumentary: Morrissey "Your Arsenal"

Mick Ronson produces this album, which some critics have called the fifth Smiths album. It blends Morrissey's voice with rockabilly and glam rock influences to create Morrissey's most solid solo effort to date.

Discumentary: Muddy Waters "Hard Again"

The Blues legend's 1977 "comeback" album teamed him up with many Blues greats.  Produced by Johnny Winter, and winner of a Grammy Award, "Hard Again" captures 63 year-old Muddy Waters and his band in a raw, firey performance.

Discumentary: My Morning Jacket "It Still Moves"

With the release of "It Still Moves", My Morning Jacket had arrived. The album featured epic tales laid out over an arrangement of sparse chords, echoing reverb and Jim Jones' high lonesome vocals and lead some critics to call the band's sound 'Southern Psych'.

Discumentary: Neil Young "Harvest"

Neil Young's fourth solo album, Harvest, was the best selling album of 1972. For the recording of the album, he enlisted the help of several artists including Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, and Crosby, Stills and Nash. The hit song "Heart of Gold" remains Young's only #1 song.

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