Discumentary: Charles Brown "All My Life"

Charles Brown had quite an amazing career, he was an R...

Discumentary: Coldplay "Parachutes"

Coldplay rose to stardom with their debut album. The British quartet redefined the Brit-rock sound. This album is not only appreciated by music fans, but by music critics as well.

Discumentary: Cracker "Cracker"

From the ashes of college-radio faves Camper Van Beethoven, came Cracker. David Lowery formed Cracker which brings a mainstream rock sound to his quirky and cynical lyrics. Their debut album earned them success in the growing alternative radio scene of the time, as well as a mainstream hit.

Discumentary: Creedence Clearwater Revival "Cosmo's Factory"

This was CCR's fifth album, released around the two-year anniversary of their vinyl debut. Cosmo's Factory was the group's peak of popularity featuring "Who'll Stop the Rain" and an eleven-minute version of "I Heard it Through the Grapevine".

Discumentary: Curtis Mayfield "Super Fly"

Curtis Mayfield's soundtrack to the 1972 blaxploitation film "Superfly" is considered to be a classic. It was also a huge commercial success and set a new standard for film soundtracks.

Discumentary: Dar Williams "End of the Summer"

For Dar Williams' long time fans, hearing this album must have been rather shocking, like when Dylan went electric. Williams set aside her acoustic singer-songwriter side and released this more "plugged in" album that features drum machines and electric guitars backing up her soprano voice and...

Discumentary: David Bowie "Diamond Dogs"

David Bowie's concept album was inspired by George Orwell's novel "1984". Bowie brings his own glam-rock vision of a post-apocalyptic world to the recording and works without his band The Spiders from Mars for the first time since 1969.

Discumentary: David Bowie "Heroes"

"Heroes" was David Bowie's second release of 1977, it was also the second installment of his collaborations with Brian Eno known as the "Berlin Trilogy". Recorded in a studio in West Berlin that overlooked The Wall, the album is influenced by German bands of the time like Kraftwerk and Neu!

Discumentary: David Bowie "Ziggy Stardust"

Part glam rock, part progressive rock, Bowie's classic redefined himself in the UK and made him a hit for the first time in the US.

Discumentary: Depeche Mode "Violator"

Depeche Mode's seventh album was also their first in the 90's. For this one, the band changed their approach to how they an album. That change paid off and it ushered them into the 90's as leaders in the alternative rock movement.

Discumentary: Dusty Springfield "Dusty in Memphis"

Although it was a commercial failure, Dusty in Memphis is regarded by many critics to be one of the greatest albums of all time. This album mixes the sultry soulful voice of the British Pop singer with the production team for Aretha Franklin and the songwriting skills of Goffin...

Discumentary: Elliott Smith "XO"

By the time XO had come out, Smith had disbanded his group Heatmiser and earned a good reputation as a solo artist. His contributions to the film "Good Will Hunting" earned him notoriety and made XO his major album debut. It featured lush vocal sounds and was compared to the Beatles in style and...

Discumentary: Elton John "Tumbleweed Connection"

Elton John calls his third release his "country album". Inspired by the old American West, the album has many references to soldiers, drinking and death. It's considered among his finest albums, and helped make him a star in the United States.

Discumentary: Elvis Costello "Spike"

On Spike, Costello displays his influences and tries his hand at many different styles of music. The album features song collaborations with Roger McGuinn and the song "Veronica", co-written with Paul McCartney. The album's eclectic nature gave it mixed reactions among critics, but remains a fan...

Discumentary: Emmylou Harris "Wrecking Ball"

In the early 90's Emmylou Harris experienced diminishing success as a country music artist. With "Wrecking Ball" she re-invented herself musically, with help from U2 producer Daniel Lanois. Moody and atmospheric, the album also features guest performances from Steve Earle, Larry Mullen Jr., The...

Discumentary: Eric Clapton "461 Ocean Boulevard"

This is Clapton's first album after kicking heroin and his 2nd solo release following the breakup of Derek & The Dominos. Clapton turned to the blues, choosing to record songs written by Robert Johnson, Elmore James, Johnny Otis, and scored a hit with his take on Bob Marley's "I Shot the Sheriff".

Discumentary: Erin McKeown: "Grand"

McKeown's third album, features songs all written by her. She along with producer and musician David Chalfant and drummer Brian Jones, played all the music on this album. It not only explores various musical styles and shows off McKeown's talent, but also was somewhat inspired by the life of Judy...

Discumentary: Feist "The Reminder"

Headed by a commerically successful single, Feist's third solo album is already being deemed as an instant classic. It was recorded in France with her longtime collaborator, Gonzales. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2007 WYEP interview with Feist.

Discumentary: Fleetwood Mac "Rumours"

"Rumours" is the second album featuring Mick Fleetwood, John and Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, and Stevie Nicks. The McVies were in the process of divorcing, as was Mick Fleetwood. Nicks and Buckingham were breaking up as a couple. As their relationships unraveled the band's music poured out...

Discumentary: George Harrison "All Things Must Pass"

Harrison's first non-Beatle album was actually a triple album. Now available on a double CD set, It proves to be one of the best of his solo career. Produced by Phil Spector, and featuring appearances by Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr and Peter Frampton to name a few.

Discumentary: George Harrison "Brainwashed"

George Harrison was working on this album up until he died in 2001. It was completed by his son Dhani and Jeff Lynne from a set of thorough notes that George Harrison left behind. Released a year after his death, it is hailed as some of Harrison's best work.

Discumentary: Gillian Welch "Time (the Revelator)"

Shortly after the American Folk revival that followed the frenzy around the "O, Brother Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings released this album filled with heartfelt folk songs.

Discumentary: Gnarls Barkley "St. Elsewhere"

This collaboration between Danger Mouse and Cee-Lo was many years in the making. Spiraling off the success of the single "Crazy", the album was considered among the best of the year's due to it's hybrid of rock, soul and hip-hop.

Discumentary: Graham Parker "Squeezing Out Sparks"

For this release Graham Parker combined his singer-songwriter pub rock with more conventional pop elements to make a rather unconventional album. Considered to be one of the great records of the post-punk era, and one of Parker's most successful. Setting him up for mainstream success that never...

Discumentary: Gram Parsons "Grievous Angel"

Described as 'Cosmic American Music' by Parsons himself, "Grievous Angel" was his second solo album. Parsons would never get to see the album's release, due to his death from a drug overdose. Linda Ronstadt is featured on the song, "In My Hour of Darkness"

Discumentary: Grant Lee Buffalo "Mighty Joe Moon"

Grant Lee Buffalo's 1994 album is their most successful. Anchored on the songwriting and singing of Grant Lee Phillips, the album was recorded after a year's worth of touring for their debut album.  It includes their most well-known song "Mockingbirds".

Discumentary: Grateful Dead "American Beauty"

The second of two albums released by the Grateful Dead in 1970, American Beauty is the first album to feature the band's collaboration with mandolin player David Grisman. It is considered among the Dead's greatest albums, and features the hit "Truckin".

Discumentary: Greg Brown "Further In"

Greg Brown is definitely a leader in today's modern folk movement, He is the founder of Red House Records and has released many albums in the genre. Further In is one of his best efforts, in which brown delivers a solid performance backed with his descriptive lyrics.

Discumentary: Harry Nilsson "Nilsson Schmilsson"

Harry Nilsson was already a Grammy winning artist by the time he released "Nilsson Schmilsson" but this record is regarded as his crowning glory by critics and fans. Borrowing Barbra Streisand's producer and using lilting Tin Pan Alley melodies Nilsson created a classic record that would influence...

Discumentary: Iggy Pop "Lust For Life"

Iggy Pop released two albums in 1977 during a very prolific time spent in Berlin with David Bowie. Bowie produced and played on both albums, as well as co-wrote some songs with Iggy Pop. “Lust for Life” is considered to be the best of Pop’'s career, and contains some of his best known songs.

Discumentary: Indigo Girls "Indigo Girls"

At a time when female singer-songwriters were in vogue Indigo Girls were signed to Epic Records in 1988. Their second studio album,released in 1989, won critical acclaim and a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Recording.

Discumentary: Iris DeMent Infamous Angel

Iris DeMent's debut album became a success mostly due to the rave reviews it received, many critics called it an instant classic. The reviews led to DeMent signing a contract with Warner Brothers who re-released the disc in 1993. The album features guest appearances by Emmylou Harris and Iris'...

Discumentary: Iron & Wine "Our Endless Numbered Days"

Released in 2004, their second album brings Sam Beam and company out of the lo-fi bedroom studio and into a professional one. Featuring subtle arrangements and intimate lyrics, this album is a new step along the way of Iron & Wine's evolution.

Discumentary: James Brown "Live at the Apollo Theater"

James Brown and his 16-piece band did a week-long stint at Harlem's Apollo Theater late in 1962. This live recording was financed completely by Brown, and he went against his record label's wishes to make it in the first place. The album has been called one of the greatest live albums ever recorded...

Discumentary: Janis Ian "Between the Lines"

Janis Ian's seventh album was released in 1975, when she was just 24 years old. It won her two Grammy Awards and contains her best known song, "At Seventeen". Ian wrote all of the song for the album, and did most of the arrangements.

Discumentary: Janis Joplin "Pearl"

Janis Joplin died during the recording of this album, leaving the project to be finished by her band and producer. It demonstrates Joplin's amazing vocal ability, and is considered a classic. It includes Joplin's only #1 song, "Me and Bobbie McGee".

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