Discumentary: "A Christmas Gift for you from Phil Spector"

This album not only exemplifies Spector's "Wall of Sound", but features some of the early groups Spector produced in some fine performances. Together it becomes one of the greatest Christmas albums of all time.

Discumentary: "The Harder They Come" Soundtrack

This soundtrack contains music by Toots and the Maytalls, Desmond Dekker and Jimmy Cliff (who is also the star of the film). Before its was released, reggae music wasn’t really on the pop culture radar in America, this album paved the way for reggae acts to be noticed, not just in the United States...

Discumentary: "The Velvet Underground and Nico"

Its been said that the Velvet Underground sold very few copies of their debut album, but everyone who bought one started a band. This album, which is considered to be one of the most influential in rock history, is ripe with experimentation and hardly sounds dated. This album launched the careers...

Discumentary: 10,000 Maniacs "In My Tribe"

This is the folk rock group's breakthrough album. Moving them from college rock favorites to hitmakers, as this album remained on the Billboard album charts for close to a year and a half. It was the first of many hit albums, making the band and singer Natalie Merchant into stars.

Discumentary: Adele "21"

Adele's smash sophomore release chronicles the aftermath of a break up. The emotions she expresses in her lyrics and performance are universally relatable, which could be why it is one of the best-selling albums of the 21st century.  

Discumentary: Aimee Mann "Bachelor No. 2"

After Interscope rejected her album as not commercial enough Aimee Mann bought back the rights to her songs and in 2000 released it via the Internet. Its success led her to release it on her on SuperEgo label and helped inspire the film “Magnolia.”

Discumentary: Air "Moon Safari"

The debut album from the French duo of Nicolas Godin and Jean Benoit Dunckel was quickly hailed as an instant classic. Air's sound was unlike many others in the electronica movement of the time, trading in big beats for mellow grooves that equally evoke trip-hop and Burt Bacharach.

Discumentary: Al Green "Let's Stay Together"

After flirting with breakthrough success Al Green shot to super-stardom with his 1972 album “Let’s Stay Together.” By blending Memphis horns with traditional soul grooves Green created a sound that came to epitomize ’70’s soul. The title track became Green’s first #1 hit.

Discumentary: Alison Krauss and Union Station "New Favorite"

The 9th release from Alison Krauss and Union Station peaked in Billboard's top 50 albums in the fall of 2001 and won the Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album of the Year while the single “The Lucky One” nabbed a Grammy for Best Country Duo or Group Performance.

Discumentary: Amy Winehouse "Back to Black"

A worldwide smash hit and winner of multiple Grammy Awards, the "neo-soul" of Amy Winehouse's "Back to Black" made her a household name. A great combination of her lyrics and voice, plus music from The Dap-Kings and the production skills of Salaam Remi and Mark Ronson. Released in 2006, it is...

Discumentary: Andrew Bird "The Mysterious Production of Eggs"

Andrew Bird bought a farm in Illinois in the early 2000's in hopes to get away from Chicago to work on music. He completed this album in 2005. It is the first of his albums to feature him playing the guitar and not the violin. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2004 WYEP interview with...

Discumentary: Angelique Kidjo "Black Ivory Soul"

Throughout her career Angelique Kidjo has combined modern music styles with traditional African music. On “Black Ivory Soul”, Kidjo adds the sounds of Brazil. Some Brazilian artists perform on the album, including guitarist Vinicius Canturia. The album also features ?uestlove from the Roots and...

Discumentary: Ani Difranco "Little Plastic Castle"

“Little Plastic Castle” was Ani Difranco’'s 8th studio album and her most commercially successful release. Tune in to hear the story behind the album and the unique artist who is considered one of the most powerful independent artists in the music world.

Discumentary: Arcade Fire "Funeral"

Arcade Fire's 2004 debut took many by surprise. Funeral shows the Canadian 5-piece band with their fascinating arrangements and a big sound for an indie-rock band. Funeral set the stage for Arcade Fire to grow bigger musically and become one of the most successful acts of recent years.

Discumentary: Aretha Franklin "Lady Soul"

Aretha's third album for Atlantic records, this one includes the hits "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" and Chain of Fools. It also reatures an impressive collection of musicians, including a young Eric Clapton.

Discumentary: Beck "Odelay"

Armed with more than two turntables and a microphone, Beck's sophomore effort mixes various genres of music together, resulting in an album that bridges the gap between country and hip hop. Produced by the Dust Brothers, this is Beck's most talked about album.

Discumentary: Belle and Sebastian "The Boy with the Arab Strap"

Belle and Sebastian grew out of a class project and became a sensation in the U.K. due to word of mouth. Their third album, which is steeped in a wide array of musical influences, grew their audience even more, and earned them a coveted Brit Award.

Discumentary: Ben Folds Five "Ben Folds Five"

Even though they were a trio, the Ben Folds Five formed in North Carolina and released this as their debut. It bridged the gap between piano rock and alternative rock, and paving the way for their breakout success.

Discumentary: Ben Harper "Diamonds On the Inside"

This 2003 released was the first time in 10 years that Ben Harper did not credit his band, Innocent Criminals, even though the band did back him, aided by new addition Marc Ford, formerly of the Black Crowes. The songs reveal a wide range of influences as Harper deftly mixes gospel, soul, rock, and...

Discumentary: Beth Orton "Central Reservation"

Orton's sophomore release took a step back from her earlier "folktronica" leanings and brought an album that was more organic in sound. This allowed for a focus on her excellent songwriting and performance, enhanced by guest artists like Dr. John, Terry Callier and Ben Harper.

Discumentary: Bettye LaVette: "I've Got My Own Hell To Raise"

Detroit soul singer Bettye LaVette spent four decades in the music industry and suffered many disappointments and missed opportunities. This 2005 release featured 10 covers of songs written by women including Lucinda Williams and Sinead O’Connor and helped revive her career.

Discumentary: Big Star "#1 Record"

Unlike most other pop groups in the 70ís, Big Star made songs with sensible harmonies as well as catchy hooks. Band mates Chris Bell and Alex Chilton shared guitar and vocals for most of the record. While Big star never received critical acclaim, they unofficially started the genre “power pop.”

Discumentary: Billy Bragg "Worker's Playtime"

Billy Bragg'’s 4th album highlights the two subjects for which he is best known, socialist politics and bittersweet love. Opening with "“She'’s Got a Brand New Spell"” and ending with “"Waiting For the Great Leap Forward”", Bragg rails against capitalism and the vulgarities of love.

Discumentary: Bjork "Debut"

After the breakup of the Sugarcubes, Bjork released this album not only to tell the world that she had gone solo, but that she was taking things to a new level. From fun, upbeat dance numbers to sparse accapella songs, this album set the stage for Bjork's varied career.

Discumentary: Blind Boys of Alabama "Higher Ground"

This is the album that made this sixty-something year old gospel group known to more than the “masses”. With a little help from Robert Randolph and the Family Band and Ben Harper, It won them their second Grammy award and it features songs from Prince, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis...

Discumentary: Blondie "Parallel Lines"

This album began Blondie’'s rise to stardom, and rocketed them past many of their CBGB’s contemporaries as far as commercial success goes. This album contains "Heart of Glass", their first (and definitely not their last) #1 single in the U.S.

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "Blood On The Tracks"

Often referred to as Dylan’'s divorce record, “Blood On the Tracks” marked Dylan’'s return to Columbia Records after a two album stint with Asylum. It also took Dylan back to the top of the charts and won him the critical and commercial success that had eluded him for several years.

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan"

Bob Dylan's second album is a true classic. Whereas his debut album contained many covers, "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan" is when he unveiled his gift for songwriting. Containing funny, political and romantic songs, this is the album that introduced Bob Dylan to the world.

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "Time Out Of Mind"

"Time Out of Mind" is Dylan's 29th studio record and first album since 1990. Produced by Daniel Lanois (U2, Brian Eno) the album featured dark lyrics and more blues and country style songs. It marked a comeback for Dylan in the 90's and spawned the hits "Lovesick" and "Not Dark Yet".

Discumentary: Bob Marley and the Wailers "Catch A Fire"

"Catch a Fire", released in 1973, surprised many fans of Bob Marley and The Wailers with it's socially aware lyrics and militant tone. However, songwriters Bob Marley and Peter Tosh created a positive tone toward the future that emphasized the power of the individual.

Discumentary: Bruce Springsteen "Darkness on the Edge of Town"

Although it was not his most popular album, Springsteen released this one just as he was winding down from the success of "Born to Run". With more than 30 unused songs written, he picked these 10, each tell stories of life in working class America.

Discumentary: Bruce Springsteen "The Rising"

Released in the Summer of 2002, this is an album of Bruce Springsteen's reflections on the events of September 11, 2001. It's also his first album with the E-Street Band in 15 years. It was received well by critic and fans, and received three Grammy Awards.

Discumentary: Buena Vista Social Club "Buena Vista Social Club"

Comprised of Cuban and African musicians, Buena Vista Social Club, successfully mixed Cuban Rhythms and African style piano. Most of the band members were retired, and it's oldest member was 89. The album topped Latin charts and went on to win a Grammy in 1997

Discumentary: Calexico "Carried to Dust"

Calexico's 6th album loosely tells the story of an out of work writer travelling through the desert. For the effort Joey Burns and John Convertino brought back most of the band from their 2003 album, plus guest stars Sam Beam of Iron and Wine, Douglas McCombs from Tortoise and Pieta Brown.

Discumentary: Carole King "Tapestry"

Carole King spent the early part of her career co-writing hit songs with Gerry Goffin. In 1971 she released "Tapestry" and the album set the standard for singer/songwriter albums in the 70’s. It was the #1 album in the US for fifteen weeks, and stayed on the album charts for six years.

Discumentary: Cat Stevens "Tea for the Tillerman"

Cat Stevens' reinvented himself with his 1970 album "Mona Bone Jakon", and quickly followed it up with this classic release. Even returning with the same band and producer from his previous album, Stevens carried his reinvention further. This album features his smash hit "Wild World".

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