barbmstein@aol.com's blog

Canadian jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall came on stage in a black dress wearing bright shiny pink stiletto heels.  Heinz Hall was a sell out for the one-hour and forty-five minute show which began and ended with a Peggy Lee song. The large stage was framed by vertical curtains that were lit to enhance the jazzy mood provided by guitarist Anthony Wilson, bassist Robert Hurst, and drummer Jeff Hamilton.  Beginning with the first song, each musician was given many moments to shine and the crowd responded graciously each time with applause.  Krall interpreted tunes by Frank Sinatra, Sérgio Mendes, Burt Bacharach, Oscar Peterson, Louis Armstrong and Irving Berlin.  Songs from the 1930's, the title track from her latest CD "Quiet Nights" and a song she would sing for astronauts were all part of the line-up.  As Krall was growing up in Vancouver, she was listening to jazz standards on the gramophone at home and listening to her future husband, Elvis Costello, on the radio. Their 2-1/2 year old twin sons are accompanying mom on the bus during this tour.

Barb S. - Sunday Mix Host 

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The fans were singing, clapping and dancing along to their favorite Indigo Girls songs Sunday night.  They were more than receptive to the songs from their new album “Poseidon and the Bitter Bug” – which was good, since Amy Ray and Emily Saliers performed almost all of the tracks from their new disc (just released in March).  Amy and Emily started off the show with two new songs and interspersed the new material with the older more familiar tunes during a solid 90 minute plus set, and a two song encore.  Nearly two dozen songs, with the new material seamlessly intertwined among the fan favorites.  Included were some of the songs that you can find on WYEP’s 913 Essential Songs Countdown: “Power of Two”, “Galileo” (final song of the evening) and the #1 essential song “Closer to Fine” which brought David Ryan Harris back up on stage to join the Indigo Girls on a verse or two.  Amy shined solo on “Romeo & Juliet”.  Julie Wolf accompanied the Indigo Girls on stage playing electric keyboards and accordion and providing backing vocals.

Over the years, The Indigo Girls have made lot of friends in the music business; many of whom have said Amy & Emily have influenced them in their own careers.  Opening the show this evening was one of their friends (originally from Atlanta), singer-songwriter David Ryan Harris (DRH).  DRH sat in a metal folding chair while playing his guitar.  Most musicians I’ve seen prefer to stand.  The crowd was still filing in, but when DRH started doing an extended falsetto during his opening song “If I Had a Dime” he immediately captured the audience.  During his tune “Pretty Girl”, DRH weaved snippets of songs by the likes of Prince and John Mayer among others into the mix.  DRH played nearly a 50-minute set, with 8 songs (including a cover of “Uptight”).

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Singer-Songwriter Ari Hest  opened for The Clarks June 13th.  Hest brought his band, performing for nearly an hour, just a few days prior to his 30th birthday (June 16th).  Hest mentioned he would be back in Pittsburgh this fall.  This interview was conducted prior to that concert.

Barb WYEP's Sunday Mix Host (WYEP):  Hi Ari!  Thanks for taking the time to respond to some questions via email for the WYEP Music Blog!

Ari Hest (AH):  My pleasure Barb, thank you!

WYEP:  You were in Pittsburgh in March at Club Café, out on the road promoting your newly self released CD “Twelve Mondays”.  How did the tour go?  Have you reached a comfort level yet with the songs?

AH:  The tour was one of the best I've had in a long time. I hadn't been out with a band in a couple of years. I almost forgot how much fun that can be. The long drives from city to city don't seem as long when you're in the right environment. My only regret is that we didn't stay out longer. I think musically we were getting better and better with each show and unfortunately it had to end right when things were really going well. The crowds were great and I was pleasantly surprised at their knowledge of songs from 52, some of which i hadn't played live before we left.

WYEP:   Please tell us more about the ‘52’ Project that you embarked on during 2008 which led up to the recording of “Twelve Mondays”.  It was quite an ambitious project to write, record, produce and release one new song per week, for 52 weeks in a row and have your fans vote for those that would end up on “Twelve Mondays”.

AH: After leaving Columbia Records I knew I had to do something unique to stick out among the droves of singer/songwriters out there. I've always written a lot of music in my career but was never able to release it as quickly as i would've liked. An album every two years just didn't work for me. When i came up with the idea, i realized it was gonna be very difficult, but something about the challenge appealed to me. So for every monday of 2008, I recorded a new song and released in to subscribers to 52. For $20, anyone was able to get access to these songs as well as comment on them on the website built by my management. Earlier this year the subscribers voted on their favorite 12 songs and those songs appeared on "Twelve Mondays" remixed and, in some cases, re-recorded.

WYEP:  You wanted artistic control over your music, so do you have a new sense of freedom now?  Will you continue to self-release future recordings?

AH:  Definitely. I love the control as I am a control freak. As far as future recordings go, i'm open to seeing what's out there, but right now this system works for me and i have no intention of changing it up.

WYEP:You were on the inaugural Cayamo songwriters cruise in 2008, any chance you will return as a performer in 2010?

AH:  I really hope so. I had such a great time in 2008 and was bummed to miss last year's trip. What a great idea that boat is. It's the perfect vacation for music lovers. I wish it were up to me but I know the powers that be want to give some other musicians a chance to play as well, so we'll see.

WYEP:  Your next record is being produced by Alex Wong, who co-produced and arranged Vienna Teng’s most recent release “ Inland Territory ”.  When can we expect to hear some tracks from this effort?  Also how do you have anything left to write about after the ‘52’ Project?  You will also be doing some shows with Vienna Teng this summer, will this open up the chance for some collaboration on stage?

AH:  The time schedule has not been worked out yet but all i can say is I am truly excited and challenged to be working with such a talented musician as Alex. Vienna and I had our first show together last week and sang a bit on each other's material which was a treat. She's also a tremendous musician that I'm honored to play with each time.

WYEP:  The Amphitheatre at Station Square is situated along the Mon River and some railroad tracks. Well, sometimes trains go by during a performance. Do you have any songs to sing about trains?

AH:  "Dead End Driving"? "Ride The Brake"? Not exactly train songs but some of the lyrics fit. "The Weight" has a train beat, so hopefully the train will come by while we're playing that one.

WYEP:  I’ve always wanted to ask a singer-songwriter what it was like to record someone else’s song, especially when it was a hit for the other artist.  You do this amazing version of Fleetwood Mac’s “Little Lies “ on “The Green Room Sessions EP”. How did you choose that particular song to cover?  It really suits your style.

AH:  I didn't plan on it. I happened to hear "Little Lies" earlier that day on the radio and thought it might sound cool given a darker musical mood. It also happened to be around the time I began to do some home recording. Fleetwood Mac is a big influence. I learned to play guitar right around the time "The Dance" came out and it got me to listen to a lot of their previous albums. Incredible songwriters.

WYEP: Thanks for your time!

AH:  You got it Barb, thank you again!

Ari Hest belting out his last song 06.13.09 at The Ampitheatre at Station Square:

ari hest

Previous posts:

"Twelve Mondays" - A CD review: http://musicblog.wyep.org/2009/03/27/%e2%80%9ctwelve-mondays%e2%80%9d-%e2%80%93-a-cd-review/

03.17.09 Ari Hest concert review: http://musicblog.wyep.org/2009/03/17/ari-hest/

Barb S. - Sunday Mix Host

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Two decades after their first release and a dozen years since they played Pittsburgh, Toad the Wet Sprocket (TTWS) was warmly welcomed back to the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead in Munhall stage. Dean Dinning (bass, backing vocals, keyboards), Randy Guss (drums), Todd Nichols (guitar, tambourine, vocals) and Glen Phillips (vocals, guitars), along with Johnny Hawthorn (lapsteel guitar, mandolin, electric guitar) performed a well received 90-minute set, which included a 3-song encore. This was their first show together in awhile and it was not without some opening night glitches. Phillips started on the electric guitar and when he tried to switch to acoustic guitar, he wasn't able to get sound. There was some minor problems at times when he continued to switch between guitars.  Phillips also forgot the lyrics at one point to "Nightingale Song" (while the audience continued to sing along) and had to start the song again.  Jennifer came out of the audience to "sing" along on "Butterflies". The familiar songs were all there: "All I Want", "Come Back Down", "Fall Down", "Good Intentions" and "Nanci". Phillips commented that his oldest daughter is just a few years younger than he was when he was a teenager writing songs for TTWS. Nichols and Dinning also took turns on lead vocals. The audience was standing for the encore, which included "Come Down" and ended with "Walk On The Ocean" (my personal favorite!). The fact that TTWS can reunite for shows from time to time and still bring a comfort level to the stage after all these decades is commendable. The band members look and sound youthful and still seem to enjoy playing Toad music. "Walk On The Ocean" was a fitting finale, with the strains of "... grow sweeter each season to slowly grow old" echoing in the venue.

Glen Phillips at the 05.02.09 TTWS show:

Opening the show: Stephen Kellogg and the Sixers (SK6ERS). This was the first show for the MA based trio, after they spent time recently entertaining the troops. Band members include Stephen Kellogg (lead vocals, guitar, harmonica), with multi-instrumentalists who also provided back-up vocals: Boots Factor (drums, percussion) and Kit Karlson (bass, accordion and tuba, yes tuba). They did an 8-song, 40-minute set. Kellogg reminds me of a cross between Elvis Costello and Glen Phillips. He looks like Costello, sounds vocally like Phillips. "4th of July" is a 3-minute pop hit of their story. "Milwaukee" received the longest applause.  Kellogg did an extended version taking us in a rap from the ages of 20, 25, 28, to 30 into a steak house singing Tom Petty songs. Their final song, "Big Easy", involved audience participation with us going round and round in the air with our hands. Kellogg greeted fans and signed CD's in the venue lobby at intermission. I was impressed when Kellogg extended his hand to shake my hand and then signed my CD's. Their new CD, "The Bear", will be released September 8th.

Barb S. - Sunday Mix Host

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I have a confession to make. Six months ago I wouldn’t have been able to tell you a song by Toad the Wet Sprocket (TTWS). Nor did I know that Glen Phillips was a member of that group. Since December 2008 I’ve seen Glen Phillips perform four times and had the opportunity to interview him for the WYEP Music Blog http://musicblog.wyep.org/2009/04/24/toad-the-wet-sprocket-an-interview-with-glen-phillips/ and now I just had the chance to see TTWS in concert for the first time. I’m reaping the benefits of volunteering as an on-air host at an independent public radio station, by discovering new music. Grant it, this time the artist first came on the scene some 20 years ago. You really can teach an old DJ new tricks. I’ve always had the ears of a DJ, but only in the last couple of years have they been exposed to what’s often labeled as “alternative” music. I’ve been asking myself over and over why I only now have found the music of TTWS and Glen Phillips.

Mr. Barb wanted to see Jonatha Brooke. She’d been on his list of performers he’d always wanted to see live. She was coming to Pittsburgh with Glen Phillips. Mr. Barb assured me I’d like Glen Phillips, knowing I tend to like male singer-songwriters. For some reason I wasn’t really impressed with Phillips.

Mr. Barb said I would know some of the TTWS songs, like “All I Want” or his personal favorite “Fall Down”. In fact yes indeed I did know “All I Want”, one of those songs I remember from my commercial radio days. Okay, we’re on to something here. I put “All I Want” on my personal list of essential songs for WYEP’s 913 Essential Songs countdown. I was listing songs that lead me to discover certain artists . When Phillips sang an acoustic version of “All I Want” in December at the Rex, it was the only song I recognized in his set.

There would be more chances to experience Glen Phillips live. Glen Phillips was one of the many performers on the Cayamo cruise in March. We somehow ended up at all three of his performances and seemed to run into him (okay I did, really I was not stalking him!) in the Garden Café in the mornings. We had attended the late Brandi Carlile show one night and thought gee, before we head to our cabin let’s check out Phillips’ 12:30 a.m. show; never intending to stay for the full set. Well it was 2:15 a.m. before we got back to our cabin. I did recognize another TTWS song “Walk on the Ocean”, which Phillips did in his sets. It has since become my favorite TTWS track. Something about seeing a performer in the early morning hours not remember all the lyrics, bang his head on the microphone several times and talk about zombies left a positive impression on me. After Phillips’ last scheduled performance on the cruise, I was able to get an autograph and a photo with him. I’m generally not outgoing when it comes to approaching performers, so it took a bit of gumption for me to walk up to him and chat about his music.

When I saw TTWS was coming to Munhall, I thought I better take the plunge and attend the show. Glen Phillips was very gracious to agree to an e-mail interview prior to the concert (trust me they are not easy to do, you don’t have the interaction you would if the performer was there in person, face to face). Since March I’ve bought or downloaded as many TTWS and Glen Phillips CD's I could find. I feel kind of weird admitting I’m this late in the game on TTWS music. I didn’t realize that Glen Phillips wrote a lot of the lyrics for TTWS. I was intrigued by the video on Phillips first solo recording, “Abulum”. It gave me a little more insight into Phillips' songwriting process. And I as I kept listening to the music, I kept saying to myself 'oh he did that one on the cruise'. I was putting two and two together. Plus I wanted to be familiar with the music when I finally saw TTWS perform.

So, I felt I really needed to share some insights on my limited exposure to TTWS, first, before getting to the concert review, so you could understand my vantage point. I’ve had to quickly bring myself up to speed on TTWS.  Here's a link to my review of the TTWS concert (http://musicblog.wyep.org/2009/05/03/toad-the-wet-sprocket-a-concert-review/)

Barb S. - Sunday Mix Host

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Glen Phillips will be in town with Toad the Wet Sprocket on Saturday May 2nd at the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead in Munhall.

Barb WYEP's Sunday Mix Host (WYEP): Hiya glen. Thanks for taking the time to talk to us at WYEP.

Glen Phillips (GP): My pleasure

WYEP: You're doing some solo gigs before joining Toad the Wet Sprocket in Pittsburgh. How do you make the transition, literally overnight in this case, from a solo act to a group?

GP: I like the shift. It keeps me on my toes, and reminds me of what I enjoy about each style.

WYEP: You were on the Cayamo cruise in March with about 30 other singer-songwriters. As a performer on the cruise tell us about some of your experiences:

GP: Uhhh...There was a lot. My favorite moment was eating conch salad at Potter's Cay in Nassau. The next was watching Shawn Colvin play. Or maybe Lyle Lovett. 

WYEP: How did you stay awake during your 12:30 am show?

GP: I didn't, really. I think I just managed to channel some kind of dreamstate into a weird extended narrative about zombies. There were supposedly a few songs in there, too.

WYEP: Vienna Teng joined you on stage one night, did you have the opportunity to sit in with any performers?

GP: Sadly, no. Saw some great music, though.

WYEP: During your final show, you did a song you wrote about being present when your father passed away. Can you tell us more about it?

GP: Not right now...It's all in the song, though (Darkest Hour). 

WYEP: Who was your favorite performer and/or favorite performance on the cruise?

GP: Hard to say. It was a pretty amazing collection. 

Glen Phillips with Barb S. - Cayamo cruise, March 2009

WYEP: Luke Bulla joined you on the Cayamo cruise and is also a member of Works Progress Administration. As part of W.P.A. is this your first opportunity to perform at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival? It seems like it will be quite an experience with a "festivarian audience".

GP: It'll be great. I love playing with Luke and the rest of WPA. It's the most fun I've had in ages, if not ever.

WYEP: What was the biggest crowd you ever played for with Toad the Wet Sprocket?

GP: Half a million or so, at the Capitol Mall in DC.

WYEP: Who were some of the memorable acts that Toad the Wet Sprocket played / co-billed with?

GP: My favorite opening act was Geggy Tah. The audience didn't always get it, but I thought they were brilliant. Greg Kurstin (Geggy) recently produced the Lily Allen record and is also half of The Bird and The Bee.

WYEP: As a teenager, you achieved a lot of success with Toad the Wet Sprocket. What was that like, at that young age, to attain that level of fame?

GP: Probably not a good thing. It helps to foster unrealistic expectations and feelings of entitlement. It was also a lot of fun.

WYEP: Boxers or briefs? Another way of asking do you like performing as a solo act or with a group?

GP: Boxer briefs, of course. I like being in a band when it's alive and passionate and full of mutual purpose. I like being solo when I'm alive and passionate and full of purpose.

WYEP:  One thing people would be surprised to know about Toad the Wet Sprocket is????

GP: We are all aliens.

WYEP: Thanks!

Barb S. - Sunday Mix Host

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Sophisticated.  Elegant.  Grace under pressure even when she makes a mistake.  Vienna Teng is not just another singer-songwriter.  Club Café hosted the Vienna Teng Trio:  Vienna Teng, vocals and keyboards.  Ward Williams plays the cello and electric guitar. Alex Wong is a multi-instrumentalist, who co-produced Teng’s new release “Inland Territory”.  Teng talked about spending Easter in Pittsburgh and taking a ride on the Mon Incline before segueing into “In Another Life”.  She highlighted many songs from “Inland Territory”, which I’ve already added to my personal list of the best of 2009.  “The Last Snowfall”, “White Light”, “Antebellum”, “Kansas”, “Grandmother Song” and “St. Stephen’s Cross” were among the songs she performed from “Inland Territory”.  From “Dreaming Through The Noise” Teng did “Whatever You Want” and the fun “1BR/1BA”.  Teng’s expressions and delicate movements with her hands, shows that she’s really feeling the music.  Teng’s set was over 90-minutes, including a 2-song encore.

When Ari Hest was at Club Café last month, we discussed the Cayamo cruise.  He asked me if we saw Vienna Teng.  I had to confess that we did not see enough of her performances.  The venues were overflowing with people and we only caught Teng’s shows in passing.  When Teng returns to Cayamo-2010, she will be on our must-see list.

He’s from Lexington, KY.  He sings.  He writes songs.  He plays the cello exquisitely.  Ben Sollee did a too short 35-minute set.  Club Café was briefly transformed into a symphonic concert hall when the classically trained Sollee played his cello.  You could see the audience trying to be quiet and leaning forward to hear all the notes.  Sollee was joined by Alex Wong on “It’s Not Impossible”, a song he got to perform on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”.  Also, from his debut full length release, “Learning To Bend”, he did the amusing “Bury Me With My Car”.  I’d like to hear Sollee with a backing band, perhaps, in the future when Sollee headlines his own tour.  Sollee may return to the area in August.

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k.d. lang brought her dancing shoes and a brand new five-piece band to the Benedum Center for the WYEP 35th Anniversary concert.  Sometimes lang played the guitar and even attempted playing the banjo, but it was her voice that was her most used instrument throughout the almost 90-minute set, which featured several encores.  The large stage was set up with lighting and a projection screen in the back, with the band near the middle; allowing lang plenty of space to dance and interact with her band and audience.  Some of the band members were multi-instrumentalists.  Despite pleas from the audience, lang did not remove her shoes (she apparently usually performs without them) and she proved she’s very light on her feet.  An early highlight was lang’s version of Neil Young’s “Helpless”.  The first standing ovation came after she did a song from “Hymns of the 49th Parallel”, the Leonard Cohen penned “Hallelujah” in which lang showcased her extraordinary voice.  lang did vintage tracks like “Miss Chatelaine” as well as “I Dream of Spring” from her most recent release “Watershed”.  Of course lang sang “Constant Craving”, perhaps her most well known song.  During one of the encores, lang referred to Tony Bennett as her mentor.  The final song was “Lock, Stock and Teardrops” from “Shadowland”.

Fellow Canadian Meaghan Smith opened the show and this leg of the k.d. lang tour.  Smith was joined center stage by her husband Jason Mingo on guitar and harp pedal and their friend Austin Nicholsen on upright bass.  She was on stage for about 30-minutes, played seven songs and danced a little.  Smith plays guitar and also played the omnichord.  She engaged the audience using the harp pedal to accentuate what people did that day (working and laundry).  The singer song-writer reminded me of a young Linda Ronstadt.  Smith told the stories behind such songs as “Poor”, “You Got Out” and her final song about her parents sending her to bed in the summer when it was still daylight, called “Five More Minutes”.  She shared with us that she does answer her own e-mail.  Smith asked for a photo of herself from the stage with the audience in the background.  I’m sure everyone was smiling. 

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Ari Hest CD

Imagine writing, recording, producing and releasing one new song per week for 52 weeks in a row. In 2008, singer-songwriter Ari Hest did just that. On March 10, 2009 Hest self-released the studio CD, “Twelve Mondays”, containing reworked versions of the 12 fan-selected songs from the ’52’ project.

The independence and freedom has served Hest well. I learned of the ambitious project after the fact and heard the songs on “Twelve Mondays” before downloading all the Songs from 52: Winter, Spring, Summer, and Autumn. Each season contains 13 songs. From the ‘52’; 4 from Winter, 3 from Spring and Autumn and 2 from Summer made the final cut.

The first track on “Twelve Mondays” is also the first track on “Winter.” “One Two” is a deeply textured song that just sticks in your head. The first song of the ‘52’ is one of the best for the whole year. Another stand out is “Dead End Driving”, which was on “Summer”. It’s another catchy song that I keep listening to over and over again.  From “Autumn” is “Cranberry Lake” which teams up Hest with Amy Kuney in a simple duet (he attempted to sing Kuney’s part at his Club Café show). “Spring” contributed the fun sounds of “Binoculars” and “Ride the Brake”.  Other songs that deserve more than a casual listen include the tongue & cheek "I'll Be There", the rhythmic "The Weight", the layering on "Broken Voices" and the catchy "Morning Streets" along with the final track "Reason to Believe" rounding out the CD, like it starts, with one of those songs that just sticks in your head.

You can’t just comment on the final product of “Twelve Mondays” without acknowledging the pool of ‘52’. I did not hear the songs as they came out each week in 2008; instead I listened to them in order over a 5-day period. I feel there is not a weak song in the bunch. Certainly some songs sounded like demos. Some started abruptly or just ended with no warning. There was one instrumental. Many songs had multiple instruments and sounds. Guitar, piano, percussion and harmonies. You could at least hear the potential of what Hest was attempting to do with a particular song. I was impressed by actually how polished many of the songs were.

The quality and integrity of Ari Hest’s music is evident. In one review, Hest was compared to John Mayer, Bruce Springsteen and Dave Matthews. I don’t think those comparisons do justice to the depth of the songs Hest has produced over his young career (Hest will be 30 in June). To me, Ari Hest sounds like … well, Ari Hest. He is unique. Maybe in the future other artists will be likened to … Ari Hest.

On 2006’s “The Green Room Sessions EP”, Hest covers Fleetwood Mac’s “Little Lies”. It’s hard to believe it’s one person singing that song, but Hest pulls it off brilliantly.

Ari Hest has recorded almost the equivalent of a whole career worth of music in one year. What an incredible accomplishment! Well done, well done! To date, “Twelve Mondays” is my favorite CD of 2009!

www.arihest.com

Barb S. - Sunday Mix Host

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I discovered singer-songwriter Ari Hest on the 2008 Cayamo cruise.  I only had the chance to see him briefly then, but he made an immediate impression on me.  At Club Cafe, 29-year old Hest was the early show.  He was backed by Ron Calder on bass, Thad Debrock on guitar and Doug Yowell on drums.  The band also co-produced Hest's latest release "Twelve Mondays", from which he performed many tracks.  The concept, as Hest explained it, was that he wrote and shared on his website 52 songs in 2008.  He wrote a song a week and the 12 best, voted by the fans, made it on to this CD.  All sounded like winners to me.  Hest is quite tall, and seems comfortable on stage.  Even though I wasn't familiar with most of the songs, after 1 hour and 15 minutes, I didn't want the show to end.  I wanted to hear all 52 songs and then some.  The music and performer were engaging.  www.arihest.com

Tim Brantley opened the show with about a 35-minute set.  He's a singer-songwriter out of Atlanta who plays the guitar and keyboards.  He seemed like he would be more comfortable with a backing band.  He has a great voice and is very personable, making a lot of eye contact with the audience.  Brantley is releasing his first CD next month "Goldtop Heights" http://www.myspace.com/timbrantley

P.S.:  I'm going to attempt to do my first CD review.  Actually my first five, as I've been listening to Ari Hest's Songs from 52:  Winter, Spring, Summer and Autumn and the CD "Twelve Mondays" released on 03.10.09, which is a 'best of' the 52 songs.  Review is here: http://musicblog.wyep.org/2009/03/27/%e2%80%9ctwelve-mondays%e2%80%9d-%e2%80%93-a-cd-review/

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