Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: The Story "Angel in the House"

Amherst College English majors Jonatha Brooke and Jennifer Kimball performed in various Boston venues and coffeehouses during their school days. They went their separate ways after graduating in the 1980s, but reunited to record as The Story. The album was released on Green Linnet and produced by Brooke's then-husband Alain Mallet.

Discumentary: The Smashing Pumkins "Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness"

The Smashing Pumpkins third release is also a double-disc containing 28 tracks. Produced by Flood, they set out to record this album as if it was their last. The band explores a range of musical styles throughout the album from the gentle orchestral pop of "Tonight, Tonight" to the angst-y guitar rock of "Bullet with Butterfly Wings".

Discumentary: The Mavericks "Trampoline"

Going out on a limb, country radio hitmakers the Mavericks traded in their scaled down production for horns, a string section and a latin-inspired sound. This Discumentary includes excerpts from a WYEP interview with frontman Raul Malo.

Discumentary: My Morning Jacket "It Still Moves"

With the release of "It Still Moves", My Morning Jacket had arrived. The album featured epic tales laid out over an arrangement of sparse chords, echoing reverb and Jim Jones' high lonesome vocals and lead some critics to call the band's sound 'Southern Psych'.

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "Time Out Of Mind"

"Time Out of Mind" is Dylan's 29th studio record and first album since 1990. Produced by Daniel Lanois (U2, Brian Eno) the album featured dark lyrics and more blues and country style songs. It marked a comeback for Dylan in the 90's and spawned the hits "Lovesick" and "Not Dark Yet".

Discumentary: Fleetwood Mac "Rumours"

"Rumours" is the second album featuring Mick Fleetwood, John and Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, and Stevie Nicks. The McVies were in the process of divorcing, as was Mick Fleetwood. Nicks and Buckingham were breaking up as a couple. As their relationships unraveled the band's music poured out, producing their most commercially successful work. "Rumours" sold 40 million units and won the Grammy for album of the year.

Discumentary: Nick Drake "Bryter Layter"

For Nick Drake's second album, Bryter Later, he re-teamed with producer Joe Boyd to produce a more upbeat and lush record. This CD also features musicians from Fairport Convention, The Velvet Underground, and The Beach Boys. Although not a big seller in it's time, Bryter Later (along with the other 2 albums Drake released in his lifetime), has gone on to be considered among the finest folk-rock albums of all time.

Discumentary: Charles Brown "All My Life"

Charles Brown had quite an amazing career, he was an R&B star in the 40's and 50's, but was left behind in the shadows of Rock and Roll. However, Brown kept on, and in the late 80's was rediscovered. With a little help from Bonnie Raitt and others, Brown eventually received the exposure he deserved. This album could be considered his "comeback" album, even though he never stopped playing music.

Discumentary: The Verve "Urban Hymns"

Considered by many to be one of the most influential albums of the nineties, Urban Hymns remains timeless in content. Despite internal struggles, drug addictions and a large lawsuit from the Rolling Stones, The Verve were able to create an album with grand atmosphere and true sense of purpose.

Discumentary: Dusty Springfield "Dusty in Memphis"

Although it was a commercial failure, Dusty in Memphis is regarded by many critics to be one of the greatest albums of all time. This album mixes the sultry soulful voice of the British Pop singer with the production team for Aretha Franklin and the songwriting skills of Goffin & King, Bacharach & David and Randy Newman.

Discumentary: Bettye LaVette: "I've Got My Own Hell To Raise"

Detroit soul singer Bettye LaVette spent four decades in the music industry and suffered many disappointments and missed opportunities. This 2005 release featured 10 covers of songs written by women including Lucinda Williams and Sinead O’Connor and helped revive her career.

Discumentary: 10,000 Maniacs "In My Tribe"

This is the folk rock group's breakthrough album. Moving them from college rock favorites to hitmakers, as this album remained on the Billboard album charts for close to a year and a half. It was the first of many hit albums, making the band and singer Natalie Merchant into stars.

Discumentary: Aretha Franklin "Lady Soul"

Aretha's third album for Atlantic records, this one includes the hits "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" and Chain of Fools. It also reatures an impressive collection of musicians, including a young Eric Clapton.

Discumentary: Janis Ian "Between the Lines"

Janis Ian's seventh album was released in 1975, when she was just 24 years old. It won her two Grammy Awards and contains her best known song, "At Seventeen". Ian wrote all of the song for the album, and did most of the arrangements.

Discumentary: The Eurythmics "Touch"

Many call this a groundbreaking album, as it experimented with rapid electronic beats long before the word "techno" was ever thought up as a music genre. It was also tremendously successful commercially, generating three hits that were eased into popularity thanks to the newly assembled MTV.

Discumentary: Carole King "Tapestry"

Carole King spent the early part of her career co-writing hit songs with Gerry Goffin. In 1971 she released "Tapestry" and the album set the standard for singer/songwriter albums in the 70’s. It was the #1 album in the US for fifteen weeks, and stayed on the album charts for six years.

Discumentary: Warren Zevon "Excitable Boy"

Before this album was released Warren Zevon was a singer/songwriter with a few albums out. His biggest claim to fame was that Linda Ronstadt had recorded some of his songs. "Excitable Boy" was the big breakout album for him, containing the big hit "Werewolves of London", a song that takes days to get out of my head.

Discumentary: Air "Moon Safari"

The debut album from the French duo of Nicolas Godin and Jean Benoit Dunckel was quickly hailed as an instant classic. Air's sound was unlike many others in the electronica movement of the time, trading in big beats for mellow grooves that equally evoke trip-hop and Burt Bacharach.

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