Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers "Conscious Party"

This is the breakout album for Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers, it includes the single "Tomorrow People." Produced by Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club members Tina Weymouth and Chris Franz, this album is one of the top-selling reggae albums ever.

Discumentary: Sinead O'Connor "I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got"

I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got is O'Connor's sophomore album and the follow up to 1987's The Lion and the Cobra. Her hit song Nothing Compares to you, written by Prince helped propel her to stardom. It was her no-nonsense approach of the album influenced several female singer-songwriters from the nineties.

Discumentary: The B-52's "The B-52's"

The B-52's were unlike anything out there when they released their debut album, the band's unique approach made them a hit, and had songs like "Rock Lobster" and "Planet Claire" spinning at parties all over the world.

Discumentary: Ryan Adams "Gold"

After the demise of Whiskeytown, Ryan Adams went solo with the album Heartbreaker, to much critical praise. But it was his Gold album that broke him out into the mainstream, earning him crossover success and new legions of fans. Produced in 2004 by Brian Siewiorek

Discumentary: Blondie "Parallel Lines"

This album began Blondie’'s rise to stardom, and rocketed them past many of their CBGB’s contemporaries as far as commercial success goes. This album contains "Heart of Glass", their first (and definitely not their last) #1 single in the U.S.

Discumentary: T-Rex "Electric Warrior"

Marc Bolan's folk-influenced songs took on a new life when matched with the electric-blues-influenced rhythm section of drummer Bill Legend and bassist Steve Currie. This is one of Glam-rock's quintessential albums. Produced by Tony Visconti, the album hit the top of the British charts and the song "Bang a Gong (Get It On)" became the band's biggest U.S. hit.

Discumentary: Prince "Sign O' The Times"

Playing off of Apocalyptic themes and experimenting with new sounds, Prince's double album had a bit of everything. The songs range from rock to funk to psychedelic blues to gospel and show his dynamic as a musician. Popular songs included the title track and "Strange Relationship".

Discumentary: Morcheeba "Who Can You Trust?"

The British trio's debut album had them bringing something different to the world of Trip Hop. The group's Soul influences added to their distinctive atmospheric sound, and got them noticed by many who added this 'chill out' album to their collections.

Discumentary: Sam Phillips Martinis & Bikinis

Getting her start in the Christian music community, Sam Phillips left after a dispute with her label at the time. She signed with Virgin Records in 1989. "Martinis and Bikinis", her fourth solo album that was produced by her future husband T-Bone Burnett.

Discumentary: George Harrison "Brainwashed"

George Harrison was working on this album up until he died in 2001. It was completed by his son Dhani and Jeff Lynne from a set of thorough notes that George Harrison left behind. Released a year after his death, it is hailed as some of Harrison's best work.

Discumentary: John Hammond "Wicked Grin"

A remarkable album of songs written by Tom Waits, performed by John Hammond, produced by Tom Waits. The result leads to new interpretations of some of Waits' best known songs, and a feat rarely seen in the music industry.

Discumentary: Cat Stevens "Tea for the Tillerman"

Cat Stevens' reinvented himself with his 1970 album "Mona Bone Jakon", and quickly followed it up with this classic release. Even returning with the same band and producer from his previous album, Stevens carried his reinvention further. This album features his smash hit "Wild World".

Discumentary: Air "Moon Safari"

The debut album from the French duo of Nicolas Godin and Jean Benoit Dunckel was quickly hailed as an instant classic. Air's sound was unlike many others in the electronica movement of the time, trading in big beats for mellow grooves that equally evoke trip-hop and Burt Bacharach.

Discumentary: Beck "Odelay"

Armed with more than two turntables and a microphone, Beck's sophomore effort mixes various genres of music together, resulting in an album that bridges the gap between country and hip hop. Produced by the Dust Brothers, this is Beck's most talked about album.

Discumentary: Stevie Wonder "Talking Book"

This album was released in October of 1972 during what is considered Stevie Wonder's "classic period" and garnered the artist 3 Grammy Awards. Hailed as one of the greatest crossover albums of all time, it broke down the boundaries as it climbed to the top of both Billboard's rock and R&B charts.

Discumentary: Bettye LaVette: "I've Got My Own Hell To Raise"

Detroit soul singer Bettye LaVette spent four decades in the music industry and suffered many disappointments and missed opportunities. This 2005 release featured 10 covers of songs written by women including Lucinda Williams and Sinead O’Connor and helped revive her career.

Discumentary: They Might Be Giants "Flood"

John Linnell and John Flansburgh had their breakout success with their major label debut. The biggest hit off the album, "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)," was actually a cover, but their take on it fits in with the rest of the album. Flood is their best selling album to date.

Discumentary: Angelique Kidjo "Black Ivory Soul"

Throughout her career Angelique Kidjo has combined modern music styles with traditional African music. On “Black Ivory Soul”, Kidjo adds the sounds of Brazil. Some Brazilian artists perform on the album, including guitarist Vinicius Canturia. The album also features ?uestlove from the Roots and Dave Matthews.

Discumentary: "A Christmas Gift for you from Phil Spector"

This album not only exemplifies Spector's "Wall of Sound", but features some of the early groups Spector produced in some fine performances. Together it becomes one of the greatest Christmas albums of all time.

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