Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: U2 "Boy"

U2's debut album is considered to be one of the finest first albums of any band in the 1980's. It set the stage for the band's future mega-stardom.

Discumentary: The Beatles "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"

Sgt. Pepper's was released in June of 1967, solidifying the Beatles new style introduced in their 1966 album Revolver. The complex and arrangements along with Martin's innovative production style recreated rock music in an album that Rolling Stone considers to be the greatest of all time.

Discumentary: 10,000 Maniacs "In My Tribe"

This is the folk rock group's breakthrough album. Moving them from college rock favorites to hitmakers, as this album remained on the Billboard album charts for close to a year and a half. It was the first of many hit albums, making the band and singer Natalie Merchant into stars.

Discumentary: The Verve "Urban Hymns"

Considered by many to be one of the most influential albums of the nineties, Urban Hymns remains timeless in content. Despite internal struggles, drug addictions and a large lawsuit from the Rolling Stones, The Verve were able to create an album with grand atmosphere and true sense of purpose.

Discumentary: The Cure "The Head On The Door"

The Cure's sixth album merged their signature dark-goth and their pop sound which they achieved with later albums. The Head On The Door shows the band experimenting with different sylings and arrangements. This album gave them their first big success in America, reaching #59 on the Billboard album charts.

Discumentary: The Eurythmics "Touch"

Many call this a groundbreaking album, as it experimented with rapid electronic beats long before the word "techno" was ever thought up as a music genre. It was also tremendously successful commercially, generating three hits that were eased into popularity thanks to the newly assembled MTV.

Discumentary: The Kinks "…Are the Village Green Preservation Society"

Although not commercially successful, this album is a Kinks classic. A "concept" album about Ray Davies' desire for the nostalgia of "Olde England" is played out with songs about Village Greens, Steam Trains and Photographs.

Discumentary: Susan Tedeschi "Just Won't Burn"

This album received rave reviews from blues fans who praised Tedeschi for continuing and advancing the blues tradition. It features 5 songs written by Tedeschi plus a few written by her band members Tom Hambridge and Adrienne Young. Just Won't Burn went to number 2 on the mainstream blues charts, getting her opening gigs for the likes of BB King, Dr. John and Buddy Guy.

Discumentary: Arcade Fire "Funeral"

Arcade Fire's 2004 debut took many by surprise. Funeral shows the Canadian 5-piece band with their fascinating arrangements and a big sound for an indie-rock band. Funeral set the stage for Arcade Fire to grow bigger musically and become one of the most successful acts of recent years.

Discumentary: Patti Smith "Horses"

Patti Smith's groundbreaking debut album, often called the first art punk album. Smith's fusion of poetry and music defines a unique style that she continues to develop to this day.

Discumentary: Eric Clapton "461 Ocean Boulevard"

This is Clapton's first album after kicking heroin and his 2nd solo release following the breakup of Derek & The Dominos. Clapton turned to the blues, choosing to record songs written by Robert Johnson, Elmore James, Johnny Otis, and scored a hit with his take on Bob Marley's "I Shot the Sheriff".

Discumentary: Janis Joplin "Pearl"

Janis Joplin died during the recording of this album, leaving the project to be finished by her band and producer. It demonstrates Joplin's amazing vocal ability, and is considered a classic. It includes Joplin's only #1 song, "Me and Bobbie McGee".

Discumentary: Richard & Linda Thompson "I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight"

The debut album of husband and wife musical team Richard and Linda Thompson, is considered a folk rock classic. The album features some of Richard's former bandmates from Fairport Convention.

Discumentary: The Allman Brothers "Eat A Peach"

The Allman Brothers 1972 release "Eat A Peach" features the last work of founder and slide guitarist Duane Allman who died in a motorcycle accident during the recording process. The album is consider the standard bearer for southern blues/rock and features the classic tracks "Melissa" and "Blue Sky."

Discumentary: Rufus Wainwright "Poses"

Taking close to three years off between his debut album and Poses, this album features Rufus Wainwright with a soaring full band, and in scaled down acoustic numbers. His theatrical-style is enhanced with elements of opera, rock and electronica.

Discumentary: Talking Heads "The Fear of Music"

The Talking Heads grew out of the New York punk scene playing alongside Patti Smith and the Ramones. For their third album they teamed up with Brian Eno for a darker approach to their quirky post-punk music.

Discumentary: Peter Gabriel "So"

For his fifth album, Peter Gabriel teamed up with producer Daniel Lanois to produce his most upbeat and fun album, titled "So". Gabriel also recruited the help of musicians such as Kate Bush, African singer Youssou N'Dour and The Police's Stewart Copland. The album became Gabriel's breakout success, including many top 10 hits such as "Sledgehammer", "Red Rain", and "In Your Eyes".

Discumentary: Ray Charles "The Spirit of Christmas"

Ever wonder what it would sound like if Ray Charles sang "Santa Claus is Coming to Town"? Here's your answer. The genius of Ray Charles put to a selection of carols and holiday songs.

Discumentary: Coldplay "Parachutes"

Coldplay rose to stardom with their debut album. The British quartet redefined the Brit-rock sound. This album is not only appreciated by music fans, but by music critics as well.

Discumentary: The Pretenders "Learning To Crawl"

Recovering from the deaths of two of their band members, Chrissie Hynde reinvented the Pretenders with "Learning to Crawl." Her lyrics are more emotional here, but never depressing, as the Pretenders rock out in top form.

Discumentary: Portishead "Dummy"

Bristol natives Geoff Barrow and Beth Gibbons joined forces to create Portishead, making a benchmark for the trip-hop genre. They relased their debut album, "Dummy" on Go Records in 1994, which reached the top 40. The group's collaborative effort produced merit, winning them Britain's Mercury Prize and play on MTV.

Discumentary: Toots and the Maytals "Funky Kingston"

Toots and the Maytals brought fourth Jamaican traditions in both sound and style. The album featured the song "Do the Reggay" which led to the term Reggae. The band also made reggae versions of "Louie Louie" and John Denver's Country Roads.

Discumentary: The Band "The Band"

The Band's second album is considered a masterpiece. Recorded in a pool house rented from Sammy Davis Jr., this album features songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" (which was a hit for Joan Baez) and "Up On Cripple Creek."

Discumentary: Wilco "Being There"

The band's sophomore effort is considered one of the greatest albums of the nineties. With elements of power pop, psychedelia, and rhythm and blues mixed in with their signature sound, Being There shows Wilco's evolution from being just a country-rock band.

Discumentary: John Lennon "Imagine"

Known as Lennon's most important work, this album features its anthemic title track, Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound", scathing lyrics about Paul McCartney, and the guitar playing of George Harrison. Released in 1971, it was the first of only three of Lennon’s solo albums to hit #1.

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