Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Robert Randolph & The Family Band "Unclassified"

“Unclassified” is the 2nd full release from New Jersey native and Sacred Steel genius Robert Randolph and his Family Band. Showing influences that range from The Allman Brothers to Bootsy Collins to Mahalia Jackson, Randolph fully realized his musical vision on this release, creating a unique blend of rock, R&B and gospel.

Discumentary: Bjork "Debut"

After the breakup of the Sugarcubes, Bjork released this album not only to tell the world that she had gone solo, but that she was taking things to a new level. From fun, upbeat dance numbers to sparse accapella songs, this album set the stage for Bjork's varied career.

Discumentary: Roy Orbison "Mystery Girl"

Shortly after joining super group The Traveling Wilburys, Orbison made what was to be his final solo album. Mystery Girl featured the top ten hit "You Got it" and brought him popularity to a new generation.

Discumentary: Leonard Cohen "Songs of Leonard Cohen"

Already an established poet and novelist, Leonard Cohen released his debut album in 1967. Audiences were drawn to his literate songwriting on songs like "Suzanne" and "So Long Marianne".

Discumentary: Blind Boys of Alabama "Higher Ground"

This is the album that made this sixty-something year old gospel group known to more than the “masses”. With a little help from Robert Randolph and the Family Band and Ben Harper, It won them their second Grammy award and it features songs from Prince, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfieldand even Parliament Funkadelic.

Discumentary: Robyn Hitchcock and The Egyptians "Globe of Frogs"

After having great success in college radio, Hitchcock assembled The Egyptians which featured two members of his former band The Soft Boys and REM's Peter Buck. The album spawned the single Balloon Man, and eventually reached 111 on the Billboard top 200. It marked Hitchcock's major label debut.

Discumentary: David Bowie "Diamond Dogs"

David Bowie's concept album was inspired by George Orwell's novel "1984". Bowie brings his own glam-rock vision of a post-apocalyptic world to the recording and works without his band The Spiders from Mars for the first time since 1969.

Discumentary: Little Feat "Feats Don't Fail Me Now"

Little Feat continued to explore southern roots-rock and bayou funk and groove on "Feats Don't Fail Me Now". The songwriting of Lowell George and Bill Payne combined with the band's exceptional musicianship set the bar for future boogie bands.

Discumentary: Portishead "Dummy"

Bristol natives Geoff Barrow and Beth Gibbons joined forces to create Portishead, making a benchmark for the trip-hop genre. They relased their debut album, "Dummy" on Go Records in 1994, which reached the top 40. The group's collaborative effort produced merit, winning them Britain's Mercury Prize and play on MTV.

Discumentary: Arcade Fire "Funeral"

Arcade Fire's 2004 debut took many by surprise. Funeral shows the Canadian 5-piece band with their fascinating arrangements and a big sound for an indie-rock band. Funeral set the stage for Arcade Fire to grow bigger musically and become one of the most successful acts of recent years.

Discumentary: Cracker "Cracker"

From the ashes of college-radio faves Camper Van Beethoven, came Cracker. David Lowery formed Cracker which brings a mainstream rock sound to his quirky and cynical lyrics. Their debut album earned them success in the growing alternative radio scene of the time, as well as a mainstream hit.

Discumentary: Loretta Lynn "Van Lear Rose"

Loretta Lynn had been performing for more than 40 years before releasing "Van Lear Rose". The album was produced by White Stripes guitarist Jack White, who was also the band leader in the recordings. Reaching the number-two spot on Billboard's country album charts and 24 on the Top 200, "Van Lear Rose" was Lynn's most successful crossover album of her career.

Discumentary: Wilco "Being There"

The band's sophomore effort is considered one of the greatest albums of the nineties. With elements of power pop, psychedelia, and rhythm and blues mixed in with their signature sound, Being There shows Wilco's evolution from being just a country-rock band.

Discumentary: Iggy Pop "Lust For Life"

Iggy Pop released two albums in 1977 during a very prolific time spent in Berlin with David Bowie. Bowie produced and played on both albums, as well as co-wrote some songs with Iggy Pop. “Lust for Life” is considered to be the best of Pop’'s career, and contains some of his best known songs.

Discumentary: The Jayhawks "Rainy Day Music"

The Jayhawks returned to their country-rock roots with their seventh and fina album, "Rainy Day Music." It also features guest performances from Jakob Dylan, Chris Stills and Matthew Sweet.

Discumentary: Lyle Lovett "Joshua Judges Ruth"

In 1992, Lyle Lovett was working to break out of the idea that he was "just" a Country musician. On this album he added influences of Gospel and Rhythm and Blues. It was his biggest mainstream success up to the time, and was mostly ignored by Country radio.

Discumentary: John Lennon "Imagine"

Known as Lennon's most important work, this album features its anthemic title track, Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound", scathing lyrics about Paul McCartney, and the guitar playing of George Harrison. Released in 1971, it was the first of only three of Lennon’s solo albums to hit #1.

Discumentary: The Allman Brothers "Eat A Peach"

The Allman Brothers 1972 release "Eat A Peach" features the last work of founder and slide guitarist Duane Allman who died in a motorcycle accident during the recording process. The album is consider the standard bearer for southern blues/rock and features the classic tracks "Melissa" and "Blue Sky."

Discumentary: Elvis Costello "Spike"

On Spike, Costello displays his influences and tries his hand at many different styles of music. The album features song collaborations with Roger McGuinn and the song "Veronica", co-written with Paul McCartney. The album's eclectic nature gave it mixed reactions among critics, but remains a fan favorite.

Discumentary: Michelle Shocked "Short, Sharp, Shocked"

Short, Sharp, Shocked has a folky sound with a bit of country-tinged production and a collection of personal songs inspired by her youth. The album received great reviews upon its release. Its biggest hit was the song "Anchorage", a letter from a friend, set to music.

Discumentary: Gnarls Barkley "St. Elsewhere"

This collaboration between Danger Mouse and Cee-Lo was many years in the making. Spiraling off the success of the single "Crazy", the album was considered among the best of the year's due to it's hybrid of rock, soul and hip-hop.

Discumentary: Blondie "Parallel Lines"

This album began Blondie’'s rise to stardom, and rocketed them past many of their CBGB’s contemporaries as far as commercial success goes. This album contains "Heart of Glass", their first (and definitely not their last) #1 single in the U.S.

Discumentary: Elliott Smith "XO"

By the time XO had come out, Smith had disbanded his group Heatmiser and earned a good reputation as a solo artist. His contributions to the film "Good Will Hunting" earned him notoriety and made XO his major album debut. It featured lush vocal sounds and was compared to the Beatles in style and arrangements.

Discumentary: Nina Simone "Nina Simone Sings the Blues"

Nina Simone and her music were just being rediscovered in 2003, when she passed away at age 70. This album, a selection of blues originals and covers, is considered to be one of her most solid albums.

Discumentary: Al Green "Let's Stay Together"

After flirting with breakthrough success Al Green shot to super-stardom with his 1972 album “Let’s Stay Together.” By blending Memphis horns with traditional soul grooves Green created a sound that came to epitomize ’70’s soul. The title track became Green’s first #1 hit.

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