Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Randy Newman "Good Old Boys"

Randy Newman’s 1974 release “Good Old Boys” became his major commercial breakthrough. Originally conceived as a concept album about a southern man named Johnny Cutler the album morphed into a satirical examination of the Southern mystique. Newman incorporated historical events into his prism including Louisiana’s great 1927 flood and elements from Louisiana Governor Huey P. Long’s life, and took on taboos ranging from slavery, racism and Northern hypocrisy.

Discumentary: Little Feat "Feats Don't Fail Me Now"

Little Feat continued to explore southern roots-rock and bayou funk and groove on "Feats Don't Fail Me Now". The songwriting of Lowell George and Bill Payne combined with the band's exceptional musicianship set the bar for future boogie bands.

Discumentary: Rolling Stones "Exile on Main Street"

Recorded in a humid basement in France, the Stones created this masterpiece without their pants on. Some have called it more of a Rock and Roll "field recording" than a studio album. Upon its release it received a lukewarm reception, but the album is now known as a classic.

Discumentary: Big Star "#1 Record"

Unlike most other pop groups in the 70ís, Big Star made songs with sensible harmonies as well as catchy hooks. Band mates Chris Bell and Alex Chilton shared guitar and vocals for most of the record. While Big star never received critical acclaim, they unofficially started the genre “power pop.”

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "Time Out Of Mind"

"Time Out of Mind" is Dylan's 29th studio record and first album since 1990. Produced by Daniel Lanois (U2, Brian Eno) the album featured dark lyrics and more blues and country style songs. It marked a comeback for Dylan in the 90's and spawned the hits "Lovesick" and "Not Dark Yet".

Discumentary: Ben Harper "Diamonds On the Inside"

This 2003 released was the first time in 10 years that Ben Harper did not credit his band, Innocent Criminals, even though the band did back him, aided by new addition Marc Ford, formerly of the Black Crowes. The songs reveal a wide range of influences as Harper deftly mixes gospel, soul, rock, and reggae.

Discumentary: The Smashing Pumkins "Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness"

The Smashing Pumpkins third release is also a double-disc containing 28 tracks. Produced by Flood, they set out to record this album as if it was their last. The band explores a range of musical styles throughout the album from the gentle orchestral pop of "Tonight, Tonight" to the angst-y guitar rock of "Bullet with Butterfly Wings".

Discumentary: Beth Orton "Central Reservation"

Orton's sophomore release took a step back from her earlier "folktronica" leanings and brought an album that was more organic in sound. This allowed for a focus on her excellent songwriting and performance, enhanced by guest artists like Dr. John, Terry Callier and Ben Harper.

Discumentary: Neko Case "Blacklisted"

After a constant tour schedule, Neko Case recorded "Blacklisted" in Arizona, giving her a new view of her music. The album features John Convertino and Joey Burns of Calexico and covers from Aretha Franklin and Sarah Vaughn.

Discumentary: My Morning Jacket "It Still Moves"

With the release of "It Still Moves", My Morning Jacket had arrived. The album featured epic tales laid out over an arrangement of sparse chords, echoing reverb and Jim Jones' high lonesome vocals and lead some critics to call the band's sound 'Southern Psych'.

Discumentary: The Police "Synchronicity"

The Police's fifth studio album is revered as their best. Its first single, "Every Breath You Take," earned two Grammys and pushed the album to the number-one position on the Billboard charts.

Discumentary: Matthew Sweet "Girlfriend"

Amid a divorce, Matthew Sweet worked on songs for his third album. "Girlfriend" was released on Zoo Entertainment after Sweet was dropped by A&M. Released in the heyday of alternative music radio, the album became a hit in the era of Nirvana and grunge-rock.

Discumentary: The Decemberists "The Crane Wife"

The Crane Wife is the fourth album and the first on a major label for The Decemberists. Produced by Tucker Martine and Death Cab for Cutie's Chris Walla, the album retells a Japanese folktale and tells many stories of war-torn love affairs.

Discumentary: Creedence Clearwater Revival "Cosmo's Factory"

This was CCR's fifth album, released around the two-year anniversary of their vinyl debut. Cosmo's Factory was the group's peak of popularity featuring "Who'll Stop the Rain" and an eleven-minute version of "I Heard it Through the Grapevine".

Discumentary: Blind Boys of Alabama "Higher Ground"

This is the album that made this sixty-something year old gospel group known to more than the “masses”. With a little help from Robert Randolph and the Family Band and Ben Harper, It won them their second Grammy award and it features songs from Prince, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfieldand even Parliament Funkadelic.

Discumentary: The Mavericks "Trampoline"

Going out on a limb, country radio hitmakers the Mavericks traded in their scaled down production for horns, a string section and a latin-inspired sound. This Discumentary includes excerpts from a WYEP interview with frontman Raul Malo.

Discumentary: Bob Marley and the Wailers "Catch A Fire"

"Catch a Fire", released in 1973, surprised many fans of Bob Marley and The Wailers with it's socially aware lyrics and militant tone. However, songwriters Bob Marley and Peter Tosh created a positive tone toward the future that emphasized the power of the individual.

Discumentary: David Bowie "Diamond Dogs"

David Bowie's concept album was inspired by George Orwell's novel "1984". Bowie brings his own glam-rock vision of a post-apocalyptic world to the recording and works without his band The Spiders from Mars for the first time since 1969.

Discumentary: Shuggie Otis "Inspiration Information"

Rediscovered and re-released by David Byrne in 2001, this album holds up more now than it did in 1974. Far ahead of his time, Shuggie Otis and this album are cited as influences by many electronic artists today. The son of bandleader Johnny Otis, Shuggie only released two albums and performs live rarely.

Discumentary: The Clash "London Calling"

On their third release, British punk-rock legends The Clash made their political stances even more apparent. Criticizing the likes of Margaret Thatcher and American consumerism. This is considered by many to be one of the greatest albums ever recorded.

Discumentary: The The "Mind Bomb"

The The is the concept of its leader, Matt Johnson, the band’s line-up varies from album to album. This time around his band featured Johnny Marr of the Smiths. Controversial and political in nature, Mind Bomb features songs with titles like like “The Beat(en) Generation” and “Armageddon Days are here (Again)”.

Discumentary: Moby "Play"

After becoming a popular DJ, and the success of his first few techno albums, Moby makes one of his most diverse albums. Here he strays from strictly eclectronica and blends elements of rock, blues, gospel and hip-hop, and even plays every instrument on the album.

Discumentary: Lauryn Hill "The Mis-Education of Lauryn Hill"

Following the huge success of the Fugees, Lauryn Hill went solo with this one. Creating a disc of very personal songs, she demonstrated just how versatile Hip Hop could be. It also showed that Hill could be a force on her own, by winning 5 Grammy Awards and earning a Gold Record.

Discumentary: Phish "Billy Breathes"

In 1995, Phish teamed up with producer Steve Lillywhite to create their seventh album. Many critics cite this album as the closest representation of the energy of Phish's live performances. It also gave them their highest charting single in the U.S.

Discumentary: Ray LaMontagne "Trouble"

Ray LaMontagne woke up one morning, heard a Stephen Stills song on the radio, and decided to become a musician. About five years later, he released "Trouble," his debut album. Produced by Ethan Johns, who also plays percussion, piano, and bass on the album. It also features a string quintet to fill out the production. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2005 WYEP interview with LaMontagne.

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