Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Loretta Lynn "Van Lear Rose"

Loretta Lynn had been performing for more than 40 years before releasing "Van Lear Rose". The album was produced by White Stripes guitarist Jack White, who was also the band leader in the recordings. Reaching the number-two spot on Billboard's country album charts and 24 on the Top 200, "Van Lear Rose" was Lynn's most successful crossover album of her career.

Discumentary: Joe Jackson "Night and Day"

Joe Jackson's 5th release, Night & Day, was released in 1982 and marked a departure from his earlier work. The title, taken from a Cole Porter song, reflected a new sophistication in songwriting and garnered Jackson two of his biggest hit songs, "Breaking Us In Two" and "Steppin Out."

Discumentary: Tom Waits "Swordfishtrombones"

His record label considered this album much stranger than his previous albums so they dropped Tom Waits and he took his work elsewhere. Island Records signed him and released the album in 1983 to a warm reception from fans and critics. Known for the varieties of percussion and horn experimentation, "Swordfishtrombones" was the genesis of Waits' signature sound.

Discumentary: Iggy Pop "Lust For Life"

Iggy Pop released two albums in 1977 during a very prolific time spent in Berlin with David Bowie. Bowie produced and played on both albums, as well as co-wrote some songs with Iggy Pop. “Lust for Life” is considered to be the best of Pop’'s career, and contains some of his best known songs.

Discumentary: Warren Zevon "Excitable Boy"

Before this album was released Warren Zevon was a singer/songwriter with a few albums out. His biggest claim to fame was that Linda Ronstadt had recorded some of his songs. "Excitable Boy" was the big breakout album for him, containing the big hit "Werewolves of London", a song that takes days to get out of my head.

Discumentary: The Flaming Lips "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots"

The main theme of this album is based on a Japanese girl who is set to fight an army of robots that are pink. Less of a concept album and more of an album in which certain songs have a narrative thread, the Lips experimentation with music, makes this an album in which you hear something new every time.

Discumentary: Indigo Girls "Indigo Girls"

At a time when female singer-songwriters were in vogue Indigo Girls were signed to Epic Records in 1988. Their second studio album,released in 1989, won critical acclaim and a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Recording.

Discumentary: Lyle Lovett "Joshua Judges Ruth"

In 1992, Lyle Lovett was working to break out of the idea that he was "just" a Country musician. On this album he added influences of Gospel and Rhythm and Blues. It was his biggest mainstream success up to the time, and was mostly ignored by Country radio.

Discumentary: Joni Mitchell "Court and Spark"

Joni Mitchell introduced jazz inflections into her folk-rock style signaling a new direction for the Canadian singer/songwriter. "Help Me" became Mitchell's only top-ten hit and the album hit double platinum.

Discumentary: Michael Franti "Everyone Deserves Music"

Creating what he calls 'Conscious Music for the Masses', Micheal Franti tackles topics like AIDS, homelessness and police brutality but sets these themes to melodies you can groove to. "Everyone Deserves Music" is an extension of this method that includes elements of funk, folk, reggae and rock. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2004 WYEP interview with Michael Franti.

Discumentary: Bjork "Debut"

After the breakup of the Sugarcubes, Bjork released this album not only to tell the world that she had gone solo, but that she was taking things to a new level. From fun, upbeat dance numbers to sparse accapella songs, this album set the stage for Bjork's varied career.

Discumentary: The Replacements "Let It Be"

Considered one of the greatest rock albums from the 80's, "Let it Be" is The Replacements' third release. A coming of age album in its own right, it's fun and disjointed, complete with a Kiss cover and songs about their bass player getting his tonsils out.

Discumentary: The Jayhawks "Rainy Day Music"

The Jayhawks returned to their country-rock roots with their seventh and fina album, "Rainy Day Music." It also features guest performances from Jakob Dylan, Chris Stills and Matthew Sweet.

Discumentary: Aretha Franklin "Lady Soul"

Aretha's third album for Atlantic records, this one includes the hits "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" and Chain of Fools. It also reatures an impressive collection of musicians, including a young Eric Clapton.

Discumentary: Janis Ian "Between the Lines"

Janis Ian's seventh album was released in 1975, when she was just 24 years old. It won her two Grammy Awards and contains her best known song, "At Seventeen". Ian wrote all of the song for the album, and did most of the arrangements.

Discumentary: Paula Cole "This Fire"

Cole's sophomore release; this album went Gold pretty quickly thanks to the singles "Where Have all the Cowboys Gone" and "I Don't Want to Wait." But there's more than hit singles to this album, including a duet between Cole and her mentor, Peter Gabriel.

Discumentary: Oasis "(What's the Story) Morning Glory?"

Oasis' second album came somewhere between the band having the fastest selling debut in British history, and their declaration that they were bigger than the Beatles. This album is often considered one of the greatest albums in British rock.

Discumentary: Greg Brown "Further In"

Greg Brown is definitely a leader in today's modern folk movement, He is the founder of Red House Records and has released many albums in the genre. Further In is one of his best efforts, in which brown delivers a solid performance backed with his descriptive lyrics.

Discumentary: Carole King "Tapestry"

Carole King spent the early part of her career co-writing hit songs with Gerry Goffin. In 1971 she released "Tapestry" and the album set the standard for singer/songwriter albums in the 70’s. It was the #1 album in the US for fifteen weeks, and stayed on the album charts for six years.

Discumentary: Lucinda Williams "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road"

Lucinda Williams took 6 years to complete "Car Wheels On a Gravel Road" but the album won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album and has made many top 100 albums lists. Williams writes sparse, unsparingly honest and often painful stories of ordinary lives.

Discumentary: The Who "The Who Sell Out"

British rock legends The Who made their third album as an homage to Radio London. To give the album more of a "corporate" feel, they added in commercials here and there, with the album cover showing the band plugging product like Heinz Baked Beans.

Discumentary: Grateful Dead "American Beauty"

The second of two albums released by the Grateful Dead in 1970, American Beauty is the first album to feature the band's collaboration with mandolin player David Grisman. It is considered among the Dead's greatest albums, and features the hit "Truckin".

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Discumentary: Tracy Chapman "Tracy Chapman"

In spirit of the singer-songwriter tradition that was beginning to resurface, Chapman's debut album sits comfortably alongside such names as Natalie Merchant and Suzanne Vega. The album is largely political in nature, dealing with issues such as racism, violence against women, and poverty.

Discumentary: Otis Redding "Otis Blue"

This 1965 release established Otis Redding as a major star, as he brought raw passion to the songs of Sam Cooke, B.B. King, and The Rolling Stones. It also contains the original version of Redding's self-penned classic "Respect".

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