Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Rufus Wainwright "Poses"

Taking close to three years off between his debut album and Poses, this album features Rufus Wainwright with a soaring full band, and in scaled down acoustic numbers. His theatrical-style is enhanced with elements of opera, rock and electronica.

Discumentary: Joni Mitchell "Court and Spark"

Joni Mitchell introduced jazz inflections into her folk-rock style signaling a new direction for the Canadian singer/songwriter. "Help Me" became Mitchell's only top-ten hit and the album hit double platinum.

Discumentary: Ray Charles "Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music"

When Ray Charles set out to record an album of country songs, his record label though he was crazy. Charles proved them all wrong when "Modern Sounds in Country & Western Music", became a hit. It gave Charles the crossover success he needed, eventually making him a household name.

Discumentary: Richard Thompson "Rumor and Sigh"

This is Richard Thompson's 7th solo studio album. He teamed up with producer Mitchell Froom, and the result was a more "polished" effort than Thompson's previous work. This album broadened Thompson's appeal and earned him a Grammy nomination. It features "1952 Vincent Black Lightning", one of Thompson's most beloved songs.

Discumentary: Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings "100 Days, 100 Nights"

By 2007, The Dap Kings were rising stars in music, due to their appearance on Amy Winehouse's "Back in Black" a year earlier. With Sharon Jones on vocals, the group released their 3rd album that year. Recorded on all analog equipment, the album sounds like an old classic, while still remaining fresh.

Discumentary: Norah Jones "Come Away With Me"

Norah Jones' debut album took the world by storm, a jazz-inspired disc that started out as a favorite of critics. The album went on to sell more than 18 million copies. It also earned Jones eight Grammy Awards.

Discumentary: Ani Difranco "Little Plastic Castle"

“Little Plastic Castle” was Ani Difranco’'s 8th studio album and her most commercially successful release. Tune in to hear the story behind the album and the unique artist who is considered one of the most powerful independent artists in the music world.

Discumentary: Big Star "#1 Record"

Unlike most other pop groups in the 70ís, Big Star made songs with sensible harmonies as well as catchy hooks. Band mates Chris Bell and Alex Chilton shared guitar and vocals for most of the record. While Big star never received critical acclaim, they unofficially started the genre “power pop.”

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "Blood On The Tracks"

Often referred to as Dylan’'s divorce record, “Blood On the Tracks” marked Dylan’'s return to Columbia Records after a two album stint with Asylum. It also took Dylan back to the top of the charts and won him the critical and commercial success that had eluded him for several years.

Discumentary: Sam Phillips Martinis & Bikinis

Getting her start in the Christian music community, Sam Phillips left after a dispute with her label at the time. She signed with Virgin Records in 1989. "Martinis and Bikinis", her fourth solo album that was produced by her future husband T-Bone Burnett.

Discumentary: U2 "The Joshua Tree"

For this record, U2 created a dark, expressive and American influenced sound deriving from rock, blues and country. The Edge's trademark echoing guitar work and Bono's passionate lyrics on songs such as "I still haven't found what I'm looking for" and "Where the streets have no name" helped the band achieve a Grammy for the year's best album.

Discumentary: Rolling Stones "Exile on Main Street"

Recorded in a humid basement in France, the Stones created this masterpiece without their pants on. Some have called it more of a Rock and Roll "field recording" than a studio album. Upon its release it received a lukewarm reception, but the album is now known as a classic.

Discumentary: The Smiths "The Queen Is Dead"

The Smiths' 3rd studio album featured songs by guitarist Johnny Marr and singer Morrissey. It was released in June of 1986 and helped to establish the band as one of the best British rock bands of the era. "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out" and "Big Mouth Strikes Again" highlight the album that is widely regarded to be The Smiths' best.

Discumentary: Prince "Sign O' The Times"

Playing off of Apocalyptic themes and experimenting with new sounds, Prince's double album had a bit of everything. The songs range from rock to funk to psychedelic blues to gospel and show his dynamic as a musician. Popular songs included the title track and "Strange Relationship".

Discumentary: Phish "Billy Breathes"

In 1995, Phish teamed up with producer Steve Lillywhite to create their seventh album. Many critics cite this album as the closest representation of the energy of Phish's live performances. It also gave them their highest charting single in the U.S.

Discumentary: Belle and Sebastian "The Boy with the Arab Strap"

Belle and Sebastian grew out of a class project and became a sensation in the U.K. due to word of mouth. Their third album, which is steeped in a wide array of musical influences, grew their audience even more, and earned them a coveted Brit Award.

Discumentary: Paula Cole "This Fire"

Cole's sophomore release; this album went Gold pretty quickly thanks to the singles "Where Have all the Cowboys Gone" and "I Don't Want to Wait." But there's more than hit singles to this album, including a duet between Cole and her mentor, Peter Gabriel.

Discumentary: Neko Case "Blacklisted"

After a constant tour schedule, Neko Case recorded "Blacklisted" in Arizona, giving her a new view of her music. The album features John Convertino and Joey Burns of Calexico and covers from Aretha Franklin and Sarah Vaughn.

Discumentary: Gillian Welch "Time (the Revelator)"

Shortly after the American Folk revival that followed the frenzy around the "O, Brother Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings released this album filled with heartfelt folk songs.

Discumentary: Eric Clapton "461 Ocean Boulevard"

This is Clapton's first album after kicking heroin and his 2nd solo release following the breakup of Derek & The Dominos. Clapton turned to the blues, choosing to record songs written by Robert Johnson, Elmore James, Johnny Otis, and scored a hit with his take on Bob Marley's "I Shot the Sheriff".

Discumentary: Graham Parker "Squeezing Out Sparks"

For this release Graham Parker combined his singer-songwriter pub rock with more conventional pop elements to make a rather unconventional album. Considered to be one of the great records of the post-punk era, and one of Parker's most successful. Setting him up for mainstream success that never happened.

Discumentary: Grateful Dead "American Beauty"

The second of two albums released by the Grateful Dead in 1970, American Beauty is the first album to feature the band's collaboration with mandolin player David Grisman. It is considered among the Dead's greatest albums, and features the hit "Truckin".

Discumentary: Bruce Springsteen "The Rising"

Released in the Summer of 2002, this is an album of Bruce Springsteen's reflections on the events of September 11, 2001. It's also his first album with the E-Street Band in 15 years. It was received well by critic and fans, and received three Grammy Awards.

Discumentary: The Kinks "…Are the Village Green Preservation Society"

Although not commercially successful, this album is a Kinks classic. A "concept" album about Ray Davies' desire for the nostalgia of "Olde England" is played out with songs about Village Greens, Steam Trains and Photographs.

Discumentary: Robert Randolph & The Family Band "Unclassified"

“Unclassified” is the 2nd full release from New Jersey native and Sacred Steel genius Robert Randolph and his Family Band. Showing influences that range from The Allman Brothers to Bootsy Collins to Mahalia Jackson, Randolph fully realized his musical vision on this release, creating a unique blend of rock, R&B and gospel.

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