Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Feist "The Reminder"

Headed by a commerically successful single, Feist's third solo album is already being deemed as an instant classic. It was recorded in France with her longtime collaborator, Gonzales. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2007 WYEP interview with Feist.

Discumentary: Morrissey "Your Arsenal"

Mick Ronson produces this album, which some critics have called the fifth Smiths album. It blends Morrissey's voice with rockabilly and glam rock influences to create Morrissey's most solid solo effort to date.

Discumentary: Norah Jones "Come Away With Me"

Norah Jones' debut album took the world by storm, a jazz-inspired disc that started out as a favorite of critics. The album went on to sell more than 18 million copies. It also earned Jones eight Grammy Awards.

Discumentary: Curtis Mayfield "Super Fly"

Curtis Mayfield's soundtrack to the 1972 blaxploitation film "Superfly" is considered to be a classic. It was also a huge commercial success and set a new standard for film soundtracks.

Discumentary: Leonard Cohen "Songs of Leonard Cohen"

Already an established poet and novelist, Leonard Cohen released his debut album in 1967. Audiences were drawn to his literate songwriting on songs like "Suzanne" and "So Long Marianne".

Discumentary: Simon and Garfunkel "Bookends"

Following the success of the Graduate, Simon and Garfunkel put together a well crafted folk album featuring Simon's poignant lyrics and Garfunkel's elusive vocals. The album featured a completed and re-arranged version of Mrs. Robinson, the hit song America, and a recording of old people simply called Voices of Old People.

Discumentary: Kathleen Edwards "Failer"

Kathleen Edwards shot to the forefront of the alternative country scene with her 2003 debut release. Her blunt lyrics, character sketch approach to songwriting, and sexy prairie drawl drew raves from critics and comparisons to Lucinda Williams.

Discumentary: Jeff Buckley "Grace"

Jeff Buckley's only complete studio album featured a strong Led Zeppelin influence and, although critically acclaimed, was not initially a commercial success. Over the years it has gained legendary status thanks to Buckley's stunning version of Leonard Cohen's iconic song "Hallelujah" and for his soaring vocals and passionate delivery.

Discumentary: "A Very Special Christmas"

A Very Special Christmas was created by Producer Jimmy Iovine to benefit the Special Olympics. Stand out songs include Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas by the Pretenders and Merry Christmas Baby performed by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street band. The CD also featured the likes of The Eurythmics, Run-DMC, U2 to name a few.

Discumentary: Harry Nilsson "Nilsson Schmilsson"

Harry Nilsson was already a Grammy winning artist by the time he released "Nilsson Schmilsson" but this record is regarded as his crowning glory by critics and fans. Borrowing Barbra Streisand's producer and using lilting Tin Pan Alley melodies Nilsson created a classic record that would influence a new generation of brainy, sardonic songwriters.

Discumentary: "The Velvet Underground and Nico"

Its been said that the Velvet Underground sold very few copies of their debut album, but everyone who bought one started a band. This album, which is considered to be one of the most influential in rock history, is ripe with experimentation and hardly sounds dated. This album launched the careers of Lou Reed and John Cale and features the art of its producer, Andy Warhol.

Discumentary: Liz Phair "Exile in Guyville"

Upon its release, Interview Magazine called Exile in Guyville "folk rock that could make you blush". This is Liz Phair's response to the Rolling Stones classic Exile in Guyville -- a pretty big undertaking for a debut album.

Discumentary: Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros "Streetcore"

Strummer's last album, which was finished by his band after his death, included introspective lyrics and a heavy reggae influence. The album is considered one of Strummer's finest since the Clash. It is partially produced by Rick Rubin, and features a cover of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song".

Discumentary: Neil Young "Harvest"

Neil Young's fourth solo album, Harvest, was the best selling album of 1972. For the recording of the album, he enlisted the help of several artists including Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, and Crosby, Stills and Nash. The hit song "Heart of Gold" remains Young's only #1 song.

Discumentary: David Bowie "Ziggy Stardust"

Part glam rock, part progressive rock, Bowie's classic redefined himself in the UK and made him a hit for the first time in the US.

Discumentary: U2 "Boy"

U2's debut album is considered to be one of the finest first albums of any band in the 1980's. It set the stage for the band's future mega-stardom.

Discumentary: The Beatles "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"

Sgt. Pepper's was released in June of 1967, solidifying the Beatles new style introduced in their 1966 album Revolver. The complex and arrangements along with Martin's innovative production style recreated rock music in an album that Rolling Stone considers to be the greatest of all time.

Discumentary: 10,000 Maniacs "In My Tribe"

This is the folk rock group's breakthrough album. Moving them from college rock favorites to hitmakers, as this album remained on the Billboard album charts for close to a year and a half. It was the first of many hit albums, making the band and singer Natalie Merchant into stars.

Discumentary: The Cure "The Head On The Door"

The Cure's sixth album merged their signature dark-goth and their pop sound which they achieved with later albums. The Head On The Door shows the band experimenting with different sylings and arrangements. This album gave them their first big success in America, reaching #59 on the Billboard album charts.

Discumentary: The Eurythmics "Touch"

Many call this a groundbreaking album, as it experimented with rapid electronic beats long before the word "techno" was ever thought up as a music genre. It was also tremendously successful commercially, generating three hits that were eased into popularity thanks to the newly assembled MTV.

Discumentary: The Kinks "…Are the Village Green Preservation Society"

Although not commercially successful, this album is a Kinks classic. A "concept" album about Ray Davies' desire for the nostalgia of "Olde England" is played out with songs about Village Greens, Steam Trains and Photographs.

Discumentary: Susan Tedeschi "Just Won't Burn"

This album received rave reviews from blues fans who praised Tedeschi for continuing and advancing the blues tradition. It features 5 songs written by Tedeschi plus a few written by her band members Tom Hambridge and Adrienne Young. Just Won't Burn went to number 2 on the mainstream blues charts, getting her opening gigs for the likes of BB King, Dr. John and Buddy Guy.

Discumentary: Arcade Fire "Funeral"

Arcade Fire's 2004 debut took many by surprise. Funeral shows the Canadian 5-piece band with their fascinating arrangements and a big sound for an indie-rock band. Funeral set the stage for Arcade Fire to grow bigger musically and become one of the most successful acts of recent years.

Discumentary: The Verve "Urban Hymns"

Considered by many to be one of the most influential albums of the nineties, Urban Hymns remains timeless in content. Despite internal struggles, drug addictions and a large lawsuit from the Rolling Stones, The Verve were able to create an album with grand atmosphere and true sense of purpose.

Discumentary: Eric Clapton "461 Ocean Boulevard"

This is Clapton's first album after kicking heroin and his 2nd solo release following the breakup of Derek & The Dominos. Clapton turned to the blues, choosing to record songs written by Robert Johnson, Elmore James, Johnny Otis, and scored a hit with his take on Bob Marley's "I Shot the Sheriff".

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