Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: The Cranberries "Everybody else is doing it, So Why Can't We?"

The Cranberries formed in Limerick, Ireland in 1990, and three years later they had their first of many Top 10 hits. The band's sound is defined by the vocals of Dolores O'Riordan, who co-writes the songs with bass player Noel Hogan.

Discumentary: X "Los Angeles"

Narrative songs and harmonies gave the band X an edge in the Los Angeles punk music scene. Produced by Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, Los Angeles includes a cover of Jim Morrison's "Soul Kitchen."

Discumentary: Pearl Jam "Vs."

Eddie Vedder and Company were coping with the new found fame from their debut album when they recorded this follow-up. This album sealed them a hardcore fan base with seven of its twelve songs becoming hits.

Discumentary: Richard & Linda Thompson "I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight"

The debut album of husband and wife musical team Richard and Linda Thompson, is considered a folk rock classic. The album features some of Richard's former bandmates from Fairport Convention.

Discumentary: The White Stripes "White Blood Cells"

The third release by the White Stripes showcases a more polished and refined sound than their previous efforts. The songs on the album show the range of the group’s influences, from Led Zeppelin to early Delta Blues. The music takes elements of these influences and fuses them with new trends.

Discumentary: U2 "Boy"

U2's debut album is considered to be one of the finest first albums of any band in the 1980's. It set the stage for the band's future mega-stardom.

Discumentary: The Church "Starfish"

The album that The Church is most renowned for, it features their smash single "Under the Milky Way". The U.S. breakthrough gave the Church a top forty hit and a Gold album, as well as sold out world tours.

Discumentary: Sam Cooke "Night Beat"

Being credited with creating soul music, Cooke recorded "Night Beat" in three nights in February of 1963. The album features keyboardist Billy Preston, then at the age of 16. Cooke was given the chance to return to his gospel roots while recording this album.

Discumentary: "The Velvet Underground and Nico"

Its been said that the Velvet Underground sold very few copies of their debut album, but everyone who bought one started a band. This album, which is considered to be one of the most influential in rock history, is ripe with experimentation and hardly sounds dated. This album launched the careers of Lou Reed and John Cale and features the art of its producer, Andy Warhol.

Discumentary: Kathleen Edwards "Failer"

Kathleen Edwards shot to the forefront of the alternative country scene with her 2003 debut release. Her blunt lyrics, character sketch approach to songwriting, and sexy prairie drawl drew raves from critics and comparisons to Lucinda Williams.

Discumentary: Billy Bragg "Worker's Playtime"

Billy Bragg'’s 4th album highlights the two subjects for which he is best known, socialist politics and bittersweet love. Opening with "“She'’s Got a Brand New Spell"” and ending with “"Waiting For the Great Leap Forward”", Bragg rails against capitalism and the vulgarities of love.

Discumentary: Kirsty MacColl "Tropical Brainstorm"

Disappointed with the music industry and recovering from a divorce, Kirsty MacColl, took six years off before recording "Tropical Brainstorm". During her break, she spent a lot of time in Cuba and Brazil, which inspired the album's many tropical influences.

Discumentary: The Decemberists "The Crane Wife"

The Crane Wife is the fourth album and the first on a major label for The Decemberists. Produced by Tucker Martine and Death Cab for Cutie's Chris Walla, the album retells a Japanese folktale and tells many stories of war-torn love affairs.

Discumentary: John Lee Hooker "Don't Look Back"

John Lee Hooker was already a legend before the making of this album. Produced by Van Morrison and Los Lobos, it features new songs a few classic remakes, further cementing his legendary status.

Discumentary: Harry Nilsson "Nilsson Schmilsson"

Harry Nilsson was already a Grammy winning artist by the time he released "Nilsson Schmilsson" but this record is regarded as his crowning glory by critics and fans. Borrowing Barbra Streisand's producer and using lilting Tin Pan Alley melodies Nilsson created a classic record that would influence a new generation of brainy, sardonic songwriters.

Discumentary: The Flaming Lips "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots"

The main theme of this album is based on a Japanese girl who is set to fight an army of robots that are pink. Less of a concept album and more of an album in which certain songs have a narrative thread, the Lips experimentation with music, makes this an album in which you hear something new every time.

Discumentary: Lou Reed & John Cale "Songs For Drella"

Songs for Drella reunited former Velvet Underground members Lou Reed and John Cale for the first time since 1968. The two got together shortly after the death of Andy Warhol and decided to pay tribute to his life. The songs feature vocals from both Cale and Reed, focusing on story rather than lavish musical arrangements.

Discumentary: Janis Joplin "Pearl"

Janis Joplin died during the recording of this album, leaving the project to be finished by her band and producer. It demonstrates Joplin's amazing vocal ability, and is considered a classic. It includes Joplin's only #1 song, "Me and Bobbie McGee".

Discumentary: Beck "Odelay"

Armed with more than two turntables and a microphone, Beck's sophomore effort mixes various genres of music together, resulting in an album that bridges the gap between country and hip hop. Produced by the Dust Brothers, this is Beck's most talked about album.

Discumentary: Morcheeba "Who Can You Trust?"

The British trio's debut album had them bringing something different to the world of Trip Hop. The group's Soul influences added to their distinctive atmospheric sound, and got them noticed by many who added this 'chill out' album to their collections.

Discumentary: Liz Phair "Exile in Guyville"

Upon its release, Interview Magazine called Exile in Guyville "folk rock that could make you blush". This is Liz Phair's response to the Rolling Stones classic Exile in Guyville -- a pretty big undertaking for a debut album.

Discumentary: The Jam "All Mod Cons"

The punk/mod-revival band The Jam released their 3rd full-length release in 1978. “All Mod Cons” produced one of their biggest hits, “Down In The Tube At Midnight” and received both commercial success and critical acclaim.

Discumentary: Ray Charles "Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music"

When Ray Charles set out to record an album of country songs, his record label though he was crazy. Charles proved them all wrong when "Modern Sounds in Country & Western Music", became a hit. It gave Charles the crossover success he needed, eventually making him a household name.

Discumentary: Richard Thompson "Rumor and Sigh"

This is Richard Thompson's 7th solo studio album. He teamed up with producer Mitchell Froom, and the result was a more "polished" effort than Thompson's previous work. This album broadened Thompson's appeal and earned him a Grammy nomination. It features "1952 Vincent Black Lightning", one of Thompson's most beloved songs.

Discumentary: Coldplay "Parachutes"

Coldplay rose to stardom with their debut album. The British quartet redefined the Brit-rock sound. This album is not only appreciated by music fans, but by music critics as well.

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