Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Coldplay "Parachutes"

Coldplay rose to stardom with their debut album. The British quartet redefined the Brit-rock sound. This album is not only appreciated by music fans, but by music critics as well.

Discumentary: PJ Harvey "To Bring You My Love"

This is Polly Jean Harvey’s third album, and her big breakout success. After dissolving the band she made her first two discs with, Harvey set forth to explore new directions in music. This is the result, and the album that earned her success on MTV, Grammy nominations and top billing in many critics “best of” lists that year.

Discumentary: Bruce Springsteen "The Rising"

Released in the Summer of 2002, this is an album of Bruce Springsteen's reflections on the events of September 11, 2001. It's also his first album with the E-Street Band in 15 years. It was received well by critic and fans, and received three Grammy Awards.

Discumentary: Toots and the Maytals "Funky Kingston"

Toots and the Maytals brought fourth Jamaican traditions in both sound and style. The album featured the song "Do the Reggay" which led to the term Reggae. The band also made reggae versions of "Louie Louie" and John Denver's Country Roads.

Discumentary: The Band "The Band"

The Band's second album is considered a masterpiece. Recorded in a pool house rented from Sammy Davis Jr., this album features songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" (which was a hit for Joan Baez) and "Up On Cripple Creek."

Discumentary: Wilco "Being There"

The band's sophomore effort is considered one of the greatest albums of the nineties. With elements of power pop, psychedelia, and rhythm and blues mixed in with their signature sound, Being There shows Wilco's evolution from being just a country-rock band.

Discumentary: John Lennon "Imagine"

Known as Lennon's most important work, this album features its anthemic title track, Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound", scathing lyrics about Paul McCartney, and the guitar playing of George Harrison. Released in 1971, it was the first of only three of Lennon’s solo albums to hit #1.

Discumentary: Gillian Welch "Time (the Revelator)"

Shortly after the American Folk revival that followed the frenzy around the "O, Brother Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings released this album filled with heartfelt folk songs.

Discumentary: Dusty Springfield "Dusty in Memphis"

Although it was a commercial failure, Dusty in Memphis is regarded by many critics to be one of the greatest albums of all time. This album mixes the sultry soulful voice of the British Pop singer with the production team for Aretha Franklin and the songwriting skills of Goffin & King, Bacharach & David and Randy Newman.

Discumentary: Steely Dan "Pretzel Logic"

In 1974 Steely Dan was structured as a standard band consisting of Walter Becker, Donald Fagen, Denny Dias, Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, and Victor Feldman. Under the guidance of producer Gary Katz the band's songs became more complex and featured a tribute to Charlie Parker and a cover of a Duke Ellington instrumental. "Pretzel Logic" was a critical and commercial success and won the band its first top 10 single with "Rikki Don't Lose That Number."

Discumentary: Emmylou Harris "Wrecking Ball"

In the early 90's Emmylou Harris experienced diminishing success as a country music artist. With "Wrecking Ball" she re-invented herself musically, with help from U2 producer Daniel Lanois. Moody and atmospheric, the album also features guest performances from Steve Earle, Larry Mullen Jr., The McGarrigle Sisters and Neil Young.

Discumentary: The Smiths "The Queen Is Dead"

The Smiths' 3rd studio album featured songs by guitarist Johnny Marr and singer Morrissey. It was released in June of 1986 and helped to establish the band as one of the best British rock bands of the era. "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out" and "Big Mouth Strikes Again" highlight the album that is widely regarded to be The Smiths' best.

Discumentary: Radiohead "OK Computer"

1997’s OK Computer is Radiohead'’s third release and marked the band’s move toward a more experimental sound. Produced by Nigel Godrich, the album’s themes included rampant consumerism, social alienation and political stagnation.

Discumentary: Robyn Hitchcock and The Egyptians "Globe of Frogs"

After having great success in college radio, Hitchcock assembled The Egyptians which featured two members of his former band The Soft Boys and REM's Peter Buck. The album spawned the single Balloon Man, and eventually reached 111 on the Billboard top 200. It marked Hitchcock's major label debut.

Discumentary: Kirsty MacColl "Tropical Brainstorm"

Disappointed with the music industry and recovering from a divorce, Kirsty MacColl, took six years off before recording "Tropical Brainstorm". During her break, she spent a lot of time in Cuba and Brazil, which inspired the album's many tropical influences.

Discumentary: Buena Vista Social Club "Buena Vista Social Club"

Comprised of Cuban and African musicians, Buena Vista Social Club, successfully mixed Cuban Rhythms and African style piano. Most of the band members were retired, and it's oldest member was 89. The album topped Latin charts and went on to win a Grammy in 1997

Discumentary: Robert Plant and Allison Krauss "Raising Sand"

"Raising Sand" features the unlikely duet of Led Zeppelin's Robert Plant, and bluegrass queen Alison Krauss. It was the winner of 5 Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year.

Discumentary: Johnny Cash "American Recordings"

Some artists need to appear younger or hipper to appeal to a younger audience. Not Johnny Cash, he sat down with his guitar, and did the same thing that made him a legend many years ago. This album, produced by Rick Rubin, won Cash a whole new generation of fans.

Discumentary: James Brown "Live at the Apollo Theater"

James Brown and his 16-piece band did a week-long stint at Harlem's Apollo Theater late in 1962. This live recording was financed completely by Brown, and he went against his record label's wishes to make it in the first place. The album has been called one of the greatest live albums ever recorded, and was on the album charts for close to a year and a half.

Discumentary: Graham Parker "Squeezing Out Sparks"

For this release Graham Parker combined his singer-songwriter pub rock with more conventional pop elements to make a rather unconventional album. Considered to be one of the great records of the post-punk era, and one of Parker's most successful. Setting him up for mainstream success that never happened.

Discumentary: Sam Cooke "Night Beat"

Being credited with creating soul music, Cooke recorded "Night Beat" in three nights in February of 1963. The album features keyboardist Billy Preston, then at the age of 16. Cooke was given the chance to return to his gospel roots while recording this album.

Discumentary: Ani Difranco "Little Plastic Castle"

“Little Plastic Castle” was Ani Difranco’'s 8th studio album and her most commercially successful release. Tune in to hear the story behind the album and the unique artist who is considered one of the most powerful independent artists in the music world.

Discumentary: Victoria Williams "Loose"

Before this album, Victoria Williams was pretty much a musician's musician. Her unique and unusual singing voice as well as her songwriting grabbed her a devout following. A tribute album that came out just before Loose raised money to pay for it.

Discumentary: Miriam Makeba "Homeland"

Miriam Mekaba's life has been an interesting one. From her beginnings as a South African jazz singer to her thirty year exile from her homeland. Mekaba chronicles these experiences on this disc, and also updates her worldwide hit "Pata Pata".

Discumentary: Dar Williams "End of the Summer"

For Dar Williams' long time fans, hearing this album must have been rather shocking, like when Dylan went electric. Williams set aside her acoustic singer-songwriter side and released this more "plugged in" album that features drum machines and electric guitars backing up her soprano voice and colorful songwriting skills.

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