Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: PJ Harvey "To Bring You My Love"

This is Polly Jean Harvey’s third album, and her big breakout success. After dissolving the band she made her first two discs with, Harvey set forth to explore new directions in music. This is the result, and the album that earned her success on MTV, Grammy nominations and top billing in many critics “best of” lists that year.

Discumentary: Luna "Penthouse"

With "Penthouse", Luna expanded their sound adding cellos, vibraphones and keyboards in with their trademark fuzzy guitar sound. Included among _Rolling Stone_'s 150 essential albums of the 90's, this one also features the guitar work of Televison's Tom Verlaine.

Discumentary: Shuggie Otis "Inspiration Information"

Rediscovered and re-released by David Byrne in 2001, this album holds up more now than it did in 1974. Far ahead of his time, Shuggie Otis and this album are cited as influences by many electronic artists today. The son of bandleader Johnny Otis, Shuggie only released two albums and performs live rarely.

Discumentary: Indigo Girls "Indigo Girls"

At a time when female singer-songwriters were in vogue Indigo Girls were signed to Epic Records in 1988. Their second studio album,released in 1989, won critical acclaim and a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Recording.

Discumentary: Matthew Sweet "Girlfriend"

Amid a divorce, Matthew Sweet worked on songs for his third album. "Girlfriend" was released on Zoo Entertainment after Sweet was dropped by A&M. Released in the heyday of alternative music radio, the album became a hit in the era of Nirvana and grunge-rock.

Discumentary: Tori Amos "Under the Pink"

Mostly recorded in a hacienda in New Mexico, "Under the Pink" is Tori Amos' second solo album. Even more piano-focused than her first, it features the singles "God" and "Cornflake Girl."

Discumentary: Oasis "(What's the Story) Morning Glory?"

Oasis' second album came somewhere between the band having the fastest selling debut in British history, and their declaration that they were bigger than the Beatles. This album is often considered one of the greatest albums in British rock.

Discumentary: Radiohead "OK Computer"

1997’s OK Computer is Radiohead'’s third release and marked the band’s move toward a more experimental sound. Produced by Nigel Godrich, the album’s themes included rampant consumerism, social alienation and political stagnation.

Discumentary: Moby "Play"

After becoming a popular DJ, and the success of his first few techno albums, Moby makes one of his most diverse albums. Here he strays from strictly eclectronica and blends elements of rock, blues, gospel and hip-hop, and even plays every instrument on the album.

Discumentary: Ben Harper "Diamonds On the Inside"

This 2003 released was the first time in 10 years that Ben Harper did not credit his band, Innocent Criminals, even though the band did back him, aided by new addition Marc Ford, formerly of the Black Crowes. The songs reveal a wide range of influences as Harper deftly mixes gospel, soul, rock, and reggae.

Discumentary: The Beach Boys "Pet Sounds"

The Beach Boys came of age with this album, which represented a new direction for the group. Filled with the Boys' perfect harmonies and Brian Wilson's obsessive production, Pet Sounds is considered one of the greatest albums of all time.

Discumentary: Angelique Kidjo "Black Ivory Soul"

Throughout her career Angelique Kidjo has combined modern music styles with traditional African music. On “Black Ivory Soul”, Kidjo adds the sounds of Brazil. Some Brazilian artists perform on the album, including guitarist Vinicius Canturia. The album also features ?uestlove from the Roots and Dave Matthews.

Discumentary: "The Harder They Come" Soundtrack

This soundtrack contains music by Toots and the Maytalls, Desmond Dekker and Jimmy Cliff (who is also the star of the film). Before its was released, reggae music wasn’t really on the pop culture radar in America, this album paved the way for reggae acts to be noticed, not just in the United States, but all around the world.

Discumentary: Aimee Mann "Bachelor No. 2"

After Interscope rejected her album as not commercial enough Aimee Mann bought back the rights to her songs and in 2000 released it via the Internet. Its success led her to release it on her on SuperEgo label and helped inspire the film “Magnolia.”

Discumentary: Buena Vista Social Club "Buena Vista Social Club"

Comprised of Cuban and African musicians, Buena Vista Social Club, successfully mixed Cuban Rhythms and African style piano. Most of the band members were retired, and it's oldest member was 89. The album topped Latin charts and went on to win a Grammy in 1997

Discumentary: Robert Plant and Allison Krauss "Raising Sand"

"Raising Sand" features the unlikely duet of Led Zeppelin's Robert Plant, and bluegrass queen Alison Krauss. It was the winner of 5 Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year.

Discumentary: Ray Charles "The Spirit of Christmas"

Ever wonder what it would sound like if Ray Charles sang "Santa Claus is Coming to Town"? Here's your answer. The genius of Ray Charles put to a selection of carols and holiday songs.

Discumentary: Cat Stevens "Tea for the Tillerman"

Cat Stevens' reinvented himself with his 1970 album "Mona Bone Jakon", and quickly followed it up with this classic release. Even returning with the same band and producer from his previous album, Stevens carried his reinvention further. This album features his smash hit "Wild World".

Discumentary: The Jimi Hendrix Experience "Electric Ladyland"

This is the third, last and most experimental album that The Jimi Hendrix Experience released. It shows Hendrix’s versatility; not only as a guitarist, but also as a singer and producer. Even with its experimental nature, it generated a couple of hits for Hendrix at the time, and remains a legendary album today.

Discumentary: The Replacements "Let It Be"

Considered one of the greatest rock albums from the 80's, "Let it Be" is The Replacements' third release. A coming of age album in its own right, it's fun and disjointed, complete with a Kiss cover and songs about their bass player getting his tonsils out.

Discumentary: Sly and the Family Stone "Stand!"

Sly Stone and his group sounded different than the hippie bands coming out of San Francisco in the late Sixties. But the integrated group's message was still one of peace, love and understanding. Their funky sound earned them a bunch of hits, including the album's title track.

Discumentary: Jeff Buckley "Grace"

Jeff Buckley's only complete studio album featured a strong Led Zeppelin influence and, although critically acclaimed, was not initially a commercial success. Over the years it has gained legendary status thanks to Buckley's stunning version of Leonard Cohen's iconic song "Hallelujah" and for his soaring vocals and passionate delivery.

Discumentary: Gram Parsons "Grievous Angel"

Described as 'Cosmic American Music' by Parsons himself, "Grievous Angel" was his second solo album. Parsons would never get to see the album's release, due to his death from a drug overdose. Linda Ronstadt is featured on the song, "In My Hour of Darkness"

Discumentary: X "Los Angeles"

Narrative songs and harmonies gave the band X an edge in the Los Angeles punk music scene. Produced by Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, Los Angeles includes a cover of Jim Morrison's "Soul Kitchen."

Discumentary: Pearl Jam "Vs."

Eddie Vedder and Company were coping with the new found fame from their debut album when they recorded this follow-up. This album sealed them a hardcore fan base with seven of its twelve songs becoming hits.

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