Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Talking Heads "The Fear of Music"

The Talking Heads grew out of the New York punk scene playing alongside Patti Smith and the Ramones. For their third album they teamed up with Brian Eno for a darker approach to their quirky post-punk music.

Discumentary: Neil Young "Harvest"

Neil Young's fourth solo album, Harvest, was the best selling album of 1972. For the recording of the album, he enlisted the help of several artists including Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, and Crosby, Stills and Nash. The hit song "Heart of Gold" remains Young's only #1 song.

Discumentary: James Brown "Live at the Apollo Theater"

James Brown and his 16-piece band did a week-long stint at Harlem's Apollo Theater late in 1962. This live recording was financed completely by Brown, and he went against his record label's wishes to make it in the first place. The album has been called one of the greatest live albums ever recorded, and was on the album charts for close to a year and a half.

Discumentary: Toots and the Maytals "Funky Kingston"

Toots and the Maytals brought fourth Jamaican traditions in both sound and style. The album featured the song "Do the Reggay" which led to the term Reggae. The band also made reggae versions of "Louie Louie" and John Denver's Country Roads.

Discumentary: Uncle Tupelo "Anodyne"

Uncle Tupelo's final effort is often hailed as their best, a perfect blend of the elements in their country-rock sound. This album was recorded completely live in an Austin studio. Less than a year after its release, both Son Volt and Wilco had been created from Uncle Tupelo's ashes.

Discumentary: Alison Krauss and Union Station "New Favorite"

The 9th release from Alison Krauss and Union Station peaked in Billboard's top 50 albums in the fall of 2001 and won the Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album of the Year while the single “The Lucky One” nabbed a Grammy for Best Country Duo or Group Performance.

Discumentary: Wilco "Yankee Hotel Foxtrot"

Almost two years in the making, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot had Wilco jumping record labels, losing band members and significantly changing their sound. The result was worth it for the band, resulting in one of the most beloved albums of 2002.

Discumentary: The Clash "London Calling"

On their third release, British punk-rock legends The Clash made their political stances even more apparent. Criticizing the likes of Margaret Thatcher and American consumerism. This is considered by many to be one of the greatest albums ever recorded.

Discumentary: The Hold Steady "Boys and Girls in America"

The Hold Steady's third release elevated them further in the eyes of critics and the hearts of fans. "Boys and Girls in America" many most "best of 2006" lists. This Discumentary features interview clips from The Hold Steady's visit to WYEP in 2007.

Discumentary: George Harrison "All Things Must Pass"

Harrison's first non-Beatle album was actually a triple album. Now available on a double CD set, It proves to be one of the best of his solo career. Produced by Phil Spector, and featuring appearances by Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr and Peter Frampton to name a few.

Discumentary: Los Lobos "Kiko"

Probably best known for their soundtrack work for the Ritchie Valens biopic "La Bamba", Los Lobos created some of their most acclaimed work after their #1 hit. For "Kiko" the group experiments with their sound on songs that range in topics from homelessness to hopefulness.

Discumentary: Randy Newman "Good Old Boys"

Randy Newman’s 1974 release “Good Old Boys” became his major commercial breakthrough. Originally conceived as a concept album about a southern man named Johnny Cutler the album morphed into a satirical examination of the Southern mystique. Newman incorporated historical events into his prism including Louisiana’s great 1927 flood and elements from Louisiana Governor Huey P. Long’s life, and took on taboos ranging from slavery, racism and Northern hypocrisy.

Discumentary: Lauryn Hill "The Mis-Education of Lauryn Hill"

Following the huge success of the Fugees, Lauryn Hill went solo with this one. Creating a disc of very personal songs, she demonstrated just how versatile Hip Hop could be. It also showed that Hill could be a force on her own, by winning 5 Grammy Awards and earning a Gold Record.

Discumentary: Roxy Music "Avalon"

English art-rock band, Roxy Music, released it’s 8th and last studio album in 1982. “Avalon” featured sophisticated production,complex melodies, and Bryan Ferry’s soulful crooning. The album was the band’s only platinum U.S. release and produced the hit single, “More Than This.”

Discumentary: Marcia Ball "Gatorhythms"

Marcia Ball mixes the blues with country honky-tonk and a little boogie on this album. This is the first album to showcase Ball's songwriting skills and it also features her notorious piano playing, that at times would make Jerry Lee Lewis jealous.

Discumentary: They Might Be Giants "Flood"

John Linnell and John Flansburgh had their breakout success with their major label debut. The biggest hit off the album, "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)," was actually a cover, but their take on it fits in with the rest of the album. Flood is their best selling album to date.

Discumentary: Curtis Mayfield "Super Fly"

Curtis Mayfield's soundtrack to the 1972 blaxploitation film "Superfly" is considered to be a classic. It was also a huge commercial success and set a new standard for film soundtracks.

Discumentary: Morrissey "Your Arsenal"

Mick Ronson produces this album, which some critics have called the fifth Smiths album. It blends Morrissey's voice with rockabilly and glam rock influences to create Morrissey's most solid solo effort to date.

Discumentary: Steve Earle "Guitar Town"

Steve Earle's 1986 debut was hailed by critics as an instant classic. Earle's writing style incorporated elements of Townes Van Zandt's mournful ballads and Springsteen's depictions of small town life.

Discumentary: Susan Tedeschi "Just Won't Burn"

This album received rave reviews from blues fans who praised Tedeschi for continuing and advancing the blues tradition. It features 5 songs written by Tedeschi plus a few written by her band members Tom Hambridge and Adrienne Young. Just Won't Burn went to number 2 on the mainstream blues charts, getting her opening gigs for the likes of BB King, Dr. John and Buddy Guy.

Discumentary: Peter Gabriel "So"

For his fifth album, Peter Gabriel teamed up with producer Daniel Lanois to produce his most upbeat and fun album, titled "So". Gabriel also recruited the help of musicians such as Kate Bush, African singer Youssou N'Dour and The Police's Stewart Copland. The album became Gabriel's breakout success, including many top 10 hits such as "Sledgehammer", "Red Rain", and "In Your Eyes".

Discumentary: Johnny Cash "American Recordings"

Some artists need to appear younger or hipper to appeal to a younger audience. Not Johnny Cash, he sat down with his guitar, and did the same thing that made him a legend many years ago. This album, produced by Rick Rubin, won Cash a whole new generation of fans.

Discumentary: Tom Petty "Wildflowers"

Produced by Rick Rubin, Tom Petty's second solo album, "Wildflowers" was certified three times platinum in 1995. Critics praised the album, albeit being almost an hour long. Petty won his first Grammy for his performance of "You Don't Know How It Feels".

Discumentary: "A Christmas Gift for you from Phil Spector"

This album not only exemplifies Spector's "Wall of Sound", but features some of the early groups Spector produced in some fine performances. Together it becomes one of the greatest Christmas albums of all time.

Discumentary: Marvin Gaye "What's Going On"

Released in 1971 at the height of societal unrest, Marvin Gaye tackled issues ranging from drug abuse to poverty to the Vietnam War, and created one of the most influential albums of all time. "What's Going On?" was also the first album to credit Motown's great session band, The Funk Brothers.

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