Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: They Might Be Giants "Flood"

John Linnell and John Flansburgh had their breakout success with their major label debut. The biggest hit off the album, "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)," was actually a cover, but their take on it fits in with the rest of the album. Flood is their best selling album to date.

Discumentary: Angelique Kidjo "Black Ivory Soul"

Throughout her career Angelique Kidjo has combined modern music styles with traditional African music. On “Black Ivory Soul”, Kidjo adds the sounds of Brazil. Some Brazilian artists perform on the album, including guitarist Vinicius Canturia. The album also features ?uestlove from the Roots and Dave Matthews.

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "Blood On The Tracks"

Often referred to as Dylan’'s divorce record, “Blood On the Tracks” marked Dylan’'s return to Columbia Records after a two album stint with Asylum. It also took Dylan back to the top of the charts and won him the critical and commercial success that had eluded him for several years.

Discumentary: Bob Dylan "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan"

Bob Dylan's second album is a true classic. Whereas his debut album contained many covers, "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan" is when he unveiled his gift for songwriting. Containing funny, political and romantic songs, this is the album that introduced Bob Dylan to the world.

Discumentary: Michelle Shocked "Short, Sharp, Shocked"

Short, Sharp, Shocked has a folky sound with a bit of country-tinged production and a collection of personal songs inspired by her youth. The album received great reviews upon its release. Its biggest hit was the song "Anchorage", a letter from a friend, set to music.

Discumentary: Lou Reed & John Cale "Songs For Drella"

Songs for Drella reunited former Velvet Underground members Lou Reed and John Cale for the first time since 1968. The two got together shortly after the death of Andy Warhol and decided to pay tribute to his life. The songs feature vocals from both Cale and Reed, focusing on story rather than lavish musical arrangements.

Discumentary: Nick Drake "Bryter Layter"

For Nick Drake's second album, Bryter Later, he re-teamed with producer Joe Boyd to produce a more upbeat and lush record. This CD also features musicians from Fairport Convention, The Velvet Underground, and The Beach Boys. Although not a big seller in it's time, Bryter Later (along with the other 2 albums Drake released in his lifetime), has gone on to be considered among the finest folk-rock albums of all time.

Discumentary: The Cranberries "Everybody else is doing it, So Why Can't We?"

The Cranberries formed in Limerick, Ireland in 1990, and three years later they had their first of many Top 10 hits. The band's sound is defined by the vocals of Dolores O'Riordan, who co-writes the songs with bass player Noel Hogan.

Discumentary: John Lee Hooker "Don't Look Back"

John Lee Hooker was already a legend before the making of this album. Produced by Van Morrison and Los Lobos, it features new songs a few classic remakes, further cementing his legendary status.

Discumentary: Sarah McLachlan "Fumbling Towards Ecstasy"

With only a small cult following in the U.S., Sarah McLachlan released this album and watched her star rise. The album features one of her best-known songs, "Posession" about obsession from a stalker's perspective.

Discumentary: Rickie Lee Jones "Rickie Lee Jones"

Rickie Lee Jones’ eponymous debut marked the assent of a mature artist and songwriter and won her the Grammy for best new artist of 1979. Jones’ songs are populated by street beatniks and her music spans cabaret to jazzy-pop. A stellar band assists her, including Randy Newman, Dr. John, and Michael McDonald.

Discumentary: U2 "The Joshua Tree"

For this record, U2 created a dark, expressive and American influenced sound deriving from rock, blues and country. The Edge's trademark echoing guitar work and Bono's passionate lyrics on songs such as "I still haven't found what I'm looking for" and "Where the streets have no name" helped the band achieve a Grammy for the year's best album.

Discumentary: Tom Waits "The Heart of Saturday Night"

Tom Waits was in the process of creating his distinctive stage persona at the time of his second studio release. "The Heart of Saturday Night" finds Waits trading in his earlier folk-rock arrangements for a 1950’s West Coast style of jazz and Waits' newly evolving gruff vocal presentation.

Discumentary: Andrew Bird "The Mysterious Production of Eggs"

Andrew Bird bought a farm in Illinois in the early 2000's in hopes to get away from Chicago to work on music. He completed this album in 2005. It is the first of his albums to feature him playing the guitar and not the violin. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2004 WYEP interview with Andrew Bird, recorded before the release of this album.

Discumentary: "The Harder They Come" Soundtrack

This soundtrack contains music by Toots and the Maytalls, Desmond Dekker and Jimmy Cliff (who is also the star of the film). Before its was released, reggae music wasn’t really on the pop culture radar in America, this album paved the way for reggae acts to be noticed, not just in the United States, but all around the world.

Discumentary: Belle and Sebastian "The Boy with the Arab Strap"

Belle and Sebastian grew out of a class project and became a sensation in the U.K. due to word of mouth. Their third album, which is steeped in a wide array of musical influences, grew their audience even more, and earned them a coveted Brit Award.

Discumentary: Alison Krauss and Union Station "New Favorite"

The 9th release from Alison Krauss and Union Station peaked in Billboard's top 50 albums in the fall of 2001 and won the Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album of the Year while the single “The Lucky One” nabbed a Grammy for Best Country Duo or Group Performance.

Discumentary: Joan Baez "Diamonds & Rust"

Folk artist and activist Joan Baez released her album "Diamonds and Rust" in 1975. Now considered one of her seminal works, the album went gold. Its title track, a ballad that explored her relationship with Bob Dylan, proved to be one of her biggest hits, and eventually hit number 35 on the pop charts.

Discumentary: X "Los Angeles"

Narrative songs and harmonies gave the band X an edge in the Los Angeles punk music scene. Produced by Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek, Los Angeles includes a cover of Jim Morrison's "Soul Kitchen."

Discumentary: Los Lobos "Kiko"

Probably best known for their soundtrack work for the Ritchie Valens biopic "La Bamba", Los Lobos created some of their most acclaimed work after their #1 hit. For "Kiko" the group experiments with their sound on songs that range in topics from homelessness to hopefulness.

Discumentary: Fleetwood Mac "Rumours"

"Rumours" is the second album featuring Mick Fleetwood, John and Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, and Stevie Nicks. The McVies were in the process of divorcing, as was Mick Fleetwood. Nicks and Buckingham were breaking up as a couple. As their relationships unraveled the band's music poured out, producing their most commercially successful work. "Rumours" sold 40 million units and won the Grammy for album of the year.

Discumentary: Pearl Jam "Vs."

Eddie Vedder and Company were coping with the new found fame from their debut album when they recorded this follow-up. This album sealed them a hardcore fan base with seven of its twelve songs becoming hits.

Discumentary: Ben Folds Five "Ben Folds Five"

Even though they were a trio, the Ben Folds Five formed in North Carolina and released this as their debut. It bridged the gap between piano rock and alternative rock, and paving the way for their breakout success.

Discumentary: Roy Orbison "Mystery Girl"

Shortly after joining super group The Traveling Wilburys, Orbison made what was to be his final solo album. Mystery Girl featured the top ten hit "You Got it" and brought him popularity to a new generation.

Discumentary: R.L. Burnside "Wish I Was in Heaven Sitting Down"

In the year 2000, RL Burnside set out to continue the blues tradition while adding more contemporary influences to it. These influences are almost more hip-hop in nature, with scratching and looping provided by DJ Swamp and Iki Levy. At the age of 73, Burnside's modern spin on traditional Delta Blues paid off, Wish I was in Heaven Sitting Down went to #8 on the Billboard Blues Album chart and was nominated for a Grammy Award that year.

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