Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: T-Rex "Electric Warrior"

Marc Bolan's folk-influenced songs took on a new life when matched with the electric-blues-influenced rhythm section of drummer Bill Legend and bassist Steve Currie. This is one of Glam-rock's quintessential albums. Produced by Tony Visconti, the album hit the top of the British charts and the song "Bang a Gong (Get It On)" became the band's biggest U.S. hit.

Discumentary: Ryan Adams "Gold"

After the demise of Whiskeytown, Ryan Adams went solo with the album Heartbreaker, to much critical praise. But it was his Gold album that broke him out into the mainstream, earning him crossover success and new legions of fans. Produced in 2004 by Brian Siewiorek

Discumentary: The Who "The Who Sell Out"

British rock legends The Who made their third album as an homage to Radio London. To give the album more of a "corporate" feel, they added in commercials here and there, with the album cover showing the band plugging product like Heinz Baked Beans.

Discumentary: Ray LaMontagne "Trouble"

Ray LaMontagne woke up one morning, heard a Stephen Stills song on the radio, and decided to become a musician. About five years later, he released "Trouble," his debut album. Produced by Ethan Johns, who also plays percussion, piano, and bass on the album. It also features a string quintet to fill out the production. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2005 WYEP interview with LaMontagne.

Discumentary: Miriam Makeba "Homeland"

Miriam Mekaba's life has been an interesting one. From her beginnings as a South African jazz singer to her thirty year exile from her homeland. Mekaba chronicles these experiences on this disc, and also updates her worldwide hit "Pata Pata".

Discumentary: Lucinda Williams "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road"

Lucinda Williams took 6 years to complete "Car Wheels On a Gravel Road" but the album won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album and has made many top 100 albums lists. Williams writes sparse, unsparingly honest and often painful stories of ordinary lives.

Discumentary: Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros "Streetcore"

Strummer's last album, which was finished by his band after his death, included introspective lyrics and a heavy reggae influence. The album is considered one of Strummer's finest since the Clash. It is partially produced by Rick Rubin, and features a cover of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song".

Discumentary: R.L. Burnside "Wish I Was in Heaven Sitting Down"

In the year 2000, RL Burnside set out to continue the blues tradition while adding more contemporary influences to it. These influences are almost more hip-hop in nature, with scratching and looping provided by DJ Swamp and Iki Levy. At the age of 73, Burnside's modern spin on traditional Delta Blues paid off, Wish I was in Heaven Sitting Down went to #8 on the Billboard Blues Album chart and was nominated for a Grammy Award that year.

Discumentary: Greg Brown "Further In"

Greg Brown is definitely a leader in today's modern folk movement, He is the founder of Red House Records and has released many albums in the genre. Further In is one of his best efforts, in which brown delivers a solid performance backed with his descriptive lyrics.

Discumentary: "A Very Special Christmas"

A Very Special Christmas was created by Producer Jimmy Iovine to benefit the Special Olympics. Stand out songs include Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas by the Pretenders and Merry Christmas Baby performed by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street band. The CD also featured the likes of The Eurythmics, Run-DMC, U2 to name a few.

Discumentary: The The "Mind Bomb"

The The is the concept of its leader, Matt Johnson, the band’s line-up varies from album to album. This time around his band featured Johnny Marr of the Smiths. Controversial and political in nature, Mind Bomb features songs with titles like like “The Beat(en) Generation” and “Armageddon Days are here (Again)”.

Discumentary: Stevie Wonder "Talking Book"

This album was released in October of 1972 during what is considered Stevie Wonder's "classic period" and garnered the artist 3 Grammy Awards. Hailed as one of the greatest crossover albums of all time, it broke down the boundaries as it climbed to the top of both Billboard's rock and R&B charts.

Discumentary: Joan Baez "Diamonds & Rust"

Folk artist and activist Joan Baez released her album "Diamonds and Rust" in 1975. Now considered one of her seminal works, the album went gold. Its title track, a ballad that explored her relationship with Bob Dylan, proved to be one of her biggest hits, and eventually hit number 35 on the pop charts.

Discumentary: Van Morrison "Astral Weeks"

The former lead singer of Them released his second solo album which became a favorite of critics. The album was recorded in two days in a New York City studio and was ranked as the 19th greatest album of all time, according to Rolling Stone Magazine.

Discumentary: Son Volt "Trace"

After the break up of alt-country pioneers Uncle Tupelo, Jay Farrar formed Son Volt. This is the band's debut which continues on a darker path somewhere between country and rock and roll. Well received by critics, it is considered by many to be one of the best albums of 1995.

Discumentary: John Hammond "Wicked Grin"

A remarkable album of songs written by Tom Waits, performed by John Hammond, produced by Tom Waits. The result leads to new interpretations of some of Waits' best known songs, and a feat rarely seen in the music industry.

Discumentary: The Band "The Band"

The Band's second album is considered a masterpiece. Recorded in a pool house rented from Sammy Davis Jr., this album features songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" (which was a hit for Joan Baez) and "Up On Cripple Creek."

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Discumentary: The Beatles "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"

Sgt. Pepper's was released in June of 1967, solidifying the Beatles new style introduced in their 1966 album Revolver. The complex and arrangements along with Martin's innovative production style recreated rock music in an album that Rolling Stone considers to be the greatest of all time.

Discumentary: Rickie Lee Jones "Rickie Lee Jones"

Rickie Lee Jones’ eponymous debut marked the assent of a mature artist and songwriter and won her the Grammy for best new artist of 1979. Jones’ songs are populated by street beatniks and her music spans cabaret to jazzy-pop. A stellar band assists her, including Randy Newman, Dr. John, and Michael McDonald.

Discumentary: Joan Armatrading "Walk Under Ladders"

Armatrading's second non-acoustic album turned her into a pop star in Britian. For this album she ranges from folk rock, to new wave to reggae. She's joined by Thomas Dolby, Sly and Robbie, Steve Lillywhite and Andy Partridge from XTC.

Discumentary: The Police "Synchronicity"

The Police's fifth studio album is revered as their best. Its first single, "Every Breath You Take," earned two Grammys and pushed the album to the number-one position on the Billboard charts.

Discumentary: Andrew Bird "The Mysterious Production of Eggs"

Andrew Bird bought a farm in Illinois in the early 2000's in hopes to get away from Chicago to work on music. He completed this album in 2005. It is the first of his albums to feature him playing the guitar and not the violin. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2004 WYEP interview with Andrew Bird, recorded before the release of this album.

Discumentary: The Modern Lovers "Modern Lovers"

This album is a series of demos that The Modern Lovers recorded in 1973 with John Cale of the Velvet Underground producing. It was released three years later three years after the band had broken up. Jonathan Richman used the Modern Lovers name on other projects he worked on, but the original line up of Richman, Jerry Harrison, David Robinson and Ernie Brooks went on to makea classic album, that is still highly regarded by critics.

Discumentary: Bob Marley and the Wailers "Catch A Fire"

"Catch a Fire", released in 1973, surprised many fans of Bob Marley and The Wailers with it's socially aware lyrics and militant tone. However, songwriters Bob Marley and Peter Tosh created a positive tone toward the future that emphasized the power of the individual.

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