Discumentary

Date

Discumentary: Iron & Wine "Our Endless Numbered Days"

Released in 2004, their second album brings Sam Beam and company out of the lo-fi bedroom studio and into a professional one. Featuring subtle arrangements and intimate lyrics, this album is a new step along the way of Iron & Wine's evolution.

Discumentary: Amy Winehouse "Back to Black"

A worldwide smash hit and winner of multiple Grammy Awards, the "neo-soul" of Amy Winehouse's "Back to Black" made her a household name. A great combination of her lyrics and voice, plus music from The Dap-Kings and the production skills of Salaam Remi and Mark Ronson. Released in 2006, it is considered among the greatest albums of the decade.

Discumentary: Patsy Cline "Sentimentally Yours"

Patsy Cline's 1962 album was her third and final full-length release. Produced by Owen Bradley, it was crafted to poise her as more of a torch singer so she could cross over to the pop charts. He added strings and back up singers (Elvis' backing band, The Jordanaires) to fill out the sound.

Discumentary: Moby "Play"

After becoming a popular DJ, and the success of his first few techno albums, Moby makes one of his most diverse albums. Here he strays from strictly eclectronica and blends elements of rock, blues, gospel and hip-hop, and even plays every instrument on the album.

Discumentary: Lauryn Hill "The Mis-Education of Lauryn Hill"

Following the huge success of the Fugees, Lauryn Hill went solo with this one. Creating a disc of very personal songs, she demonstrated just how versatile Hip Hop could be. It also showed that Hill could be a force on her own, by winning 5 Grammy Awards and earning a Gold Record.

Discumentary: Phish "Billy Breathes"

In 1995, Phish teamed up with producer Steve Lillywhite to create their seventh album. Many critics cite this album as the closest representation of the energy of Phish's live performances. It also gave them their highest charting single in the U.S.

Discumentary: Ray LaMontagne "Trouble"

Ray LaMontagne woke up one morning, heard a Stephen Stills song on the radio, and decided to become a musician. About five years later, he released "Trouble," his debut album. Produced by Ethan Johns, who also plays percussion, piano, and bass on the album. It also features a string quintet to fill out the production. This Discumentary features excerpts from a 2005 WYEP interview with LaMontagne.

Discumentary: Roxy Music "Avalon"

English art-rock band, Roxy Music, released it’s 8th and last studio album in 1982. “Avalon” featured sophisticated production,complex melodies, and Bryan Ferry’s soulful crooning. The album was the band’s only platinum U.S. release and produced the hit single, “More Than This.”

Discumentary: Bruce Springsteen "Darkness on the Edge of Town"

Although it was not his most popular album, Springsteen released this one just as he was winding down from the success of "Born to Run". With more than 30 unused songs written, he picked these 10, each tell stories of life in working class America.

Discumentary: Steve Earle "Guitar Town"

Steve Earle's 1986 debut was hailed by critics as an instant classic. Earle's writing style incorporated elements of Townes Van Zandt's mournful ballads and Springsteen's depictions of small town life.

Discumentary: Tori Amos "Under the Pink"

Mostly recorded in a hacienda in New Mexico, "Under the Pink" is Tori Amos' second solo album. Even more piano-focused than her first, it features the singles "God" and "Cornflake Girl."

Discumentary: Gram Parsons "Grievous Angel"

Described as 'Cosmic American Music' by Parsons himself, "Grievous Angel" was his second solo album. Parsons would never get to see the album's release, due to his death from a drug overdose. Linda Ronstadt is featured on the song, "In My Hour of Darkness"

Discumentary: Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings "100 Days, 100 Nights"

By 2007, The Dap Kings were rising stars in music, due to their appearance on Amy Winehouse's "Back in Black" a year earlier. With Sharon Jones on vocals, the group released their 3rd album that year. Recorded on all analog equipment, the album sounds like an old classic, while still remaining fresh.

Discumentary: Iris DeMent Infamous Angel

Iris DeMent's debut album became a success mostly due to the rave reviews it received, many critics called it an instant classic. The reviews led to DeMent signing a contract with Warner Brothers who re-released the disc in 1993. The album features guest appearances by Emmylou Harris and Iris' mother, Flora Mae.

Discumentary: Marvin Gaye "What's Going On"

Released in 1971 at the height of societal unrest, Marvin Gaye tackled issues ranging from drug abuse to poverty to the Vietnam War, and created one of the most influential albums of all time. "What's Going On?" was also the first album to credit Motown's great session band, The Funk Brothers.

Discumentary: Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers "Conscious Party"

This is the breakout album for Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers, it includes the single "Tomorrow People." Produced by Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club members Tina Weymouth and Chris Franz, this album is one of the top-selling reggae albums ever.

Discumentary: Al Green "Let's Stay Together"

After flirting with breakthrough success Al Green shot to super-stardom with his 1972 album “Let’s Stay Together.” By blending Memphis horns with traditional soul grooves Green created a sound that came to epitomize ’70’s soul. The title track became Green’s first #1 hit.

Discumentary: Taj Mahal "The Natch'l Blues"

Taj Mahal released his second album in the fall of 1968. Building on his multi-cultural approach to the blues these songs feature elements of Delta blues but also include an expanding range of influences including rock and country.

Discumentary: Elvis Costello "Spike"

On Spike, Costello displays his influences and tries his hand at many different styles of music. The album features song collaborations with Roger McGuinn and the song "Veronica", co-written with Paul McCartney. The album's eclectic nature gave it mixed reactions among critics, but remains a fan favorite.

Discumentary: Elliott Smith "XO"

By the time XO had come out, Smith had disbanded his group Heatmiser and earned a good reputation as a solo artist. His contributions to the film "Good Will Hunting" earned him notoriety and made XO his major album debut. It featured lush vocal sounds and was compared to the Beatles in style and arrangements.

Discumentary: Uncle Tupelo "Anodyne"

Uncle Tupelo's final effort is often hailed as their best, a perfect blend of the elements in their country-rock sound. This album was recorded completely live in an Austin studio. Less than a year after its release, both Son Volt and Wilco had been created from Uncle Tupelo's ashes.

Discumentary: Prince "Sign O' The Times"

Playing off of Apocalyptic themes and experimenting with new sounds, Prince's double album had a bit of everything. The songs range from rock to funk to psychedelic blues to gospel and show his dynamic as a musician. Popular songs included the title track and "Strange Relationship".

Discumentary: Sinead O'Connor "I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got"

I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got is O'Connor's sophomore album and the follow up to 1987's The Lion and the Cobra. Her hit song Nothing Compares to you, written by Prince helped propel her to stardom. It was her no-nonsense approach of the album influenced several female singer-songwriters from the nineties.

Discumentary: The B-52's "The B-52's"

The B-52's were unlike anything out there when they released their debut album, the band's unique approach made them a hit, and had songs like "Rock Lobster" and "Planet Claire" spinning at parties all over the world.

Discumentary: Ryan Adams "Gold"

After the demise of Whiskeytown, Ryan Adams went solo with the album Heartbreaker, to much critical praise. But it was his Gold album that broke him out into the mainstream, earning him crossover success and new legions of fans. Produced in 2004 by Brian Siewiorek

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